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What Size Yacht To Cross The Atlantic? (Here’s What You Need to Know)

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Crossing the Atlantic in a yacht is an ambitious but rewarding endeavor.

Whether youre a recreational sailor or a seasoned professional, the size of the yacht you choose will make a world of difference on the journey.

Before you set sail, you need to consider a number of factors, such as the number of people on board, the size and type of crew, the length of the voyage, fuel and crew requirements, route of crossing, weather conditions, and emergency services available.

In this article, well cover all these topics and more to help you find the right size yacht for your Atlantic crossing.

Table of Contents

Short Answer

The size of yacht needed to safely and comfortably cross the Atlantic Ocean will depend on factors such as the number of people on board, the type of voyage, and the experience of the captain and crew.

Generally, the vessel should be a minimum of 36 feet in length and have enough stowage capacity to carry enough supplies and provisions for the voyage.

The yacht should also be outfitted with the necessary navigation, communication, and safety equipment to make the voyage.

Lastly, it should be well-maintained to ensure reliable performance throughout the voyage.

What To Consider When Choosing A Yacht Size

When deciding what size yacht to choose for an Atlantic crossing, there are several key factors to consider.

The number of people on board, the size and type of the crew, and the length of the voyage will all factor into the size of yacht you need.

A larger yacht will provide more space and comfort, but will also require more fuel and crew to manage.

It’s also important to consider the route of the crossing, the type of weather that is expected, and the type of emergency services available along the way.

The size of yacht should also be determined by the purpose of the crossing and the preferences of the crew.

For instance, if the purpose of the voyage is primarily recreational and the crew is smaller, then a smaller yacht may be more suitable.

On the other hand, if the purpose is more commercial and the crew is larger, then a larger yacht may be the better choice.

The type of vessel is also important.

Sailboats, motorboats, and catamarans all have different requirements for size, fuel efficiency, and crew.

For instance, sailboats require larger masts and rigging, which can limit the size of the vessel.

Motorboats, on the other hand, can be larger and can travel faster, although they also require more fuel.

Catamarans are typically the largest vessels, but they also require the most crew and are the most difficult to maneuver in rough seas.

Finally, the length of the voyage is an important factor.

A longer voyage requires more fuel, supplies, and crew, so a larger yacht may be necessary.

Additionally, a longer voyage may require more sophisticated navigational and safety equipment, so it’s important to consider the type of emergency services available along the route.

In conclusion, choosing the right size yacht for an Atlantic crossing requires careful consideration of several factors.

The number of people on board, the size and type of the crew, the length of the voyage, the route, the type of weather, and the type of emergency services available all need to be taken into account.

Ultimately, the decision should be based on the purpose of the voyage and the preferences of the crew.

Number Of People On Board

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

When deciding on the size of yacht to choose for an Atlantic crossing, the number of people who will be on board should be the first factor taken into consideration.

The size of the yacht should be able to comfortably accommodate the number of passengers and crew members, with enough space for sleeping, eating, and lounging.

Any extra space that may be needed for storage should also be taken into account.

It is important to note that larger yachts will require more fuel and crew to manage, and may be more expensive to maintain.

Therefore, it is important to make sure that the size of the yacht matches the needs of the voyage and the crew.

Size And Type Of Crew

When selecting the size of your yacht for an Atlantic crossing, it’s important to consider the size and type of the crew.

If there will be a large number of people on board, a larger yacht is likely required to provide enough room and comfort.

On the other hand, a smaller yacht may be more suitable for a smaller crew.

Additionally, the size and type of crew will determine the type of personnel needed to manage the yacht.

For example, it may be necessary to hire a captain and crew if youre crossing a large body of water.

If the crew consists of experienced sailors, a smaller yacht may be sufficient as they will be able to handle all of the boats operations.

Its important to consider the number of people on board, experience level, and the amount of space available when selecting the size of yacht for an Atlantic crossing.

Length Of Voyage

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

When deciding what size yacht to choose for an Atlantic crossing, one of the most important factors to consider is the length of the voyage.

A longer voyage will require a larger yacht to provide more space and comfort for the crew and passengers.

On a longer voyage, there may be more people on board, providing a need for additional sleeping and eating areas, as well as more room for recreational activities.

Additionally, a larger yacht will be able to carry more supplies, such as food, fuel, and spare parts, making it more self-sufficient and able to handle any unforeseen events.

It is important to consider the route of the crossing, as some areas may be more prone to rough weather or dangerous conditions, and a larger yacht may be better equipped to handle these conditions.

A larger yacht may also require more fuel, as well as a larger crew, to manage the vessel.

Ultimately, the size of yacht will depend on the purpose of the crossing and the preferences of the crew.

Fuel And Crew Requirements

When deciding on the size of yacht to take for an Atlantic crossing, it’s important to factor in the fuel and crew requirements.

A larger yacht will require more fuel and crew to manage, especially if the voyage is longer.

The crew size and type should also be taken into account when deciding on the size of yacht.

A larger yacht will require more crew to manage the vessel, and the crew should be experienced and knowledgeable in seafaring and navigation.

It may also be necessary to hire extra crew members for certain tasks such as cooking, engineering, and maintenance.

Additionally, the yacht should be equipped with the necessary safety equipment such as life rafts and flares, as well as navigational equipment such as depth sounders and GPS.

All of these factors should be considered when deciding on the size of yacht for an Atlantic crossing.

Route Of Crossing

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

When deciding on the size of yacht for an Atlantic crossing, it is important to consider the route of the crossing.

For example, a longer voyage from the United States to Europe will require a larger yacht than a shorter one from the Caribbean to the United States.

A larger yacht will provide more space and comfort, as well as more fuel and crew to manage.

Additionally, the route of the crossing should be considered for emergency services that may be available along the way.

For example, if the voyage will be close to land, there may be medical facilities and emergency services that could be reached in the event of an emergency.

However, if the voyage will be far away from land, it is important to consider the type of emergency services that would be available if needed.

Weather Conditions

When deciding what size yacht to choose for an Atlantic crossing, it is essential to consider the weather conditions that may be encountered during the voyage.

A larger yacht is more likely to be able to handle a variety of weather conditions, such as high winds, heavy rain and strong waves.

The size of the yacht should also be considered when it comes to the type of weather expected.

A larger yacht is more suitable for long-distance voyages, as it is more capable of handling the prolonged and potentially extreme weather conditions.

It is important to note, however, that larger yachts may require additional fuel and crew to manage in order to safely navigate the seas.

When preparing for an Atlantic crossing, it is important to research the expected weather conditions for the route.

Knowing the weather conditions that may be expected on the route can help to determine the size of the yacht that is suitable for the voyage.

For example, if the route is expected to experience strong winds, it is best to choose a larger yacht that is capable of handling the windy conditions.

Additionally, if the route passes through areas with higher than average waves, a larger yacht is much more suitable for the voyage.

It is also important to consider the type of emergency services available along the route.

In the event of an emergency, such as a medical emergency or a vessel in distress, a larger yacht is more likely to be able to access the necessary help.

Additionally, a larger yacht will be able to carry more supplies, such as food, water, and other equipment, which can be essential in an emergency situation.

Overall, the size of the yacht for an Atlantic crossing should be based on the number of people on board, the size and type of the crew, the length of the voyage, the route of the crossing, the type of weather that is expected, and the type of emergency services available along the way.

With the right amount of research and planning, the perfect size yacht can be chosen for a successful and safe Atlantic crossing.

Emergency Services Available

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

When planning a transatlantic crossing, it is important to consider the type of emergency services available along the route.

On a smaller vessel, you may not be able to access all of the necessary services, so it is important to choose a vessel with enough room to accommodate the necessary crew and equipment, as well as enough fuel to reach the destination in the event of an emergency.

When considering the size of the yacht, the type of emergency services available should be carefully assessed.

For example, if you are crossing during hurricane season, it is important to choose a vessel that can withstand the high winds and potentially heavy waves.

If you are crossing in an area where search and rescue services are available, it is important to have a vessel large enough to be spotted quickly.

It is also important to consider the type of emergency services available at ports of call along the route.

If you are traveling to a remote area, it is important to have a vessel with enough room to accommodate the necessary crew and equipment to make port in the event of an emergency.

If you are traveling to a port with a significant presence of medical and emergency personnel, it is important to have a vessel large enough to accommodate the necessary personnel.

Overall, the size of the yacht for a transatlantic crossing should be based on the purpose of the voyage, the number of people on board, the size and type of crew, the length of the voyage, the route of the crossing, the type of weather that is expected, and the type of emergency services available along the way.

By taking all of these factors into consideration, you can ensure that you have the best possible vessel for your crossing.

Final Thoughts

Choosing the size of yacht for an Atlantic crossing is an important decision that requires careful planning.

The size of the yacht should be determined by the number of people on board, the size and type of the crew, the length of the voyage, the route of the crossing, the weather conditions, and the availability of emergency services.

Ultimately, the size of the yacht should be based on the purpose of the crossing and the preferences of the crew.

With the right information and careful consideration, you can make an informed decision on the right size yacht to choose for your Atlantic crossing.

James Frami

At the age of 15, he and four other friends from his neighborhood constructed their first boat. He has been sailing for almost 30 years and has a wealth of knowledge that he wants to share with others.

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crossing the atlantic by motor yacht

Crossing The Atlantic By Motor Yacht? Everything You Need To Know

A yacht can travel both the Pacific and Atlantic seas. A sailing boat or a motor yacht may span the Pacific and Atlantic seas. It’s preferable to have a tank large enough to store the amount of fuel you’ll be burning.

Not all yachts, however, are capable of undertaking these journeys. If you intend to sail across any of these seas, be sure you have an ocean-going boat as well as the necessary equipment and abilities.

Some yachts will not have enough fuel to make the journey and will be transported aboard specially constructed freighters.

In this essay, I’ll go over some of the key facts concerning yachts that you should be aware of before embarking on your journey.

How Long Does it Take to Sail Across the Atlantic?

Sailing across the Atlantic takes roughly 3-4 weeks, but if you’re lucky, use shortcuts, and have a speedy sailboat, you can accomplish it in two weeks. It might take up to a month if you don’t get enough wind for a week or longer. It’s critical to know the shortcuts, optimize speed, and have cross-Atlantic sailing expertise.

How Far Can a Yacht Travel?

In an 8-hour day, a powered boat of 35 feet in length can go over 200 miles at a speed of 25 knots. They can cover about 300 miles in a day at 35 knots. You can go thousands of kilometers if you have adequate gasoline or fill-ups.

Can a Yacht Cross the Atlantic Ocean?

A typical powered boat would require a tank with a capacity of roughly 5000 gallons of petrol and a fuel efficiency of 2.5 nautical miles per gallon to traverse the Atlantic.

This is based on a gasoline consumption rate of 4 gallons per hour at a cruising speed of 10 knots. Of course, this is at cruising speed. They can’t keep going at top speed for an extended amount of time (which would burn through the fuel faster).

The voyage (about 3,000 miles) would take 300 hours or 12.5 days at 10 knots.

Every year, sailing boats cross the Atlantic since the only fuel they use is to power generators that power aboard equipment.

When the weather isn’t cooperating, some fuel may be utilized to power the boat.A fast boat traveling at 25 knots takes roughly 4–5 days to cross the Atlantic Ocean. In a sailing yacht, though, it would take longer (which also depends on the winds).

We have a lot more information on which boat types are capable of crossing oceans. If you’re thinking of taking a boat journey across the oceans, this is a must-read.

Read more: Boat Fuel Tank Vent Open or Close (What to do?)

How Large Does A Boat Need To Be In Order To Cross The Atlantic Ocean?

To cross the Atlantic, you’ll need a boat that’s at least 30 feet long, whether you’re sailing or motoring. For safety and comfort, your boat should be at least 40 feet long. Although the experience of sailing or motoring across the Atlantic is vastly different, both require a boat of this size. If you plan on having a crew on board, you may need a boat that is much larger. Why do you need a 30 or 40 foot boat when you can cross the Atlantic with a lot smaller boat? The simple answer is that attempting to cross in anything smaller may be extremely risky and inconvenient. Here are a few reasons why you should get a boat at least this size:

Seaworthiness

You don’t want to be stranded in a tiny boat as the waves start to rise. In the Atlantic, boats significantly larger than 30 or 40 feet are often sunk due to bad weather.

If you go any smaller, you run the danger of being sunk in a storm. Make the mistake of assuming you can organize your vacation around the possibility of bad weather.

Storms may appear out of nowhere in the unpredictable Atlantic Ocean, and any vessel could be caught off guard, regardless of the season. Although not every 30 or 40-foot yacht is seaworthy enough to cross the North Atlantic, this size is a minimum need for ocean navigation.

Supply Storage

Even if you want to conduct as much open-ocean fishing as possible while crossing the Atlantic, you’ll need to have supplies. You should have enough food and drink for everyone in your crew to last the whole voyage.

Keep in mind that crossings can take longer than expected, so make sure you have adequate supplies to account for delays. You’ll need to reserve gasoline if you’re crossing in a motorboat or if you have a backup motor for your sailboat.

You may need a larger boat if you need to store a lot of provisions for your voyage. Too much weight can cause your boat to sink in the water, making even a seaworthy boat much less seaworthy. A boat that is too low in the water might be swamped by waves more quickly.

Before you load up your boat and set out on the water, be sure you know how much it can securely handle.

Comfort Of The Crew

Until you’ve spent a few weeks out on the open sea aboard a 30 or 40-foot boat, it may appear to be rather large. If you want to enjoy your passage, you’ll need a boat large enough for everyone on board to have their own space and stretch their legs at regular intervals throughout the journey. Even with a one- or two-person crew, 30 to 40 feet is required to achieve this aim.

Crossing The Atlantic In A Motorboat

You might be surprised to learn how much gasoline it takes to cross the Atlantic in a powerboat. Simply storing all of that fuel aboard your yacht can take up a lot of space.

Fuel should not be utilized for longer than 90 days in most cases. This should be enough time for you to cross the Atlantic, but it could not be. You may preserve fuel for up to six months or even two years if you use a fuel stabilizer or don’t mix it before use.

Fuel storage will require a large portion of your entire storage space. For the same journey, you could require a larger motorboat than a sailboat.

The advantage of crossing in a motorboat is that, while it may require more storage and gasoline, utilizing it instead of the wind for movement may make your route much more predictable. A speedboat can move in nearly any situation except particularly severe and inclement weather, but a sailboat must wait for the wind to be right to make headway. As a result, you won’t need as many resources to prepare in case you don’t arrive at your location on time.

Enjoy Your Crossing

It’s difficult to imagine a more thrilling experience than sailing the Atlantic Ocean on your own boat. You will most likely have a very pleasurable vacation whether what kind of boat you choose, as long as you choose a boat of at least 30 or 40 feet and plan wisely.

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Best Yachts for Transatlantic Crossing: Our Selection and Advice for 2023

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Sailing across the Atlantic is more than just an item on a bucket list for sailors. It’s how you get your boat to new horizons, whether to cruise the Caribbean islands or explore the waters around Europe. It’s a big undertaking and requires serious planning and a solid sailing vessel. You can cross the Atlantic by yourself, with a rally of like-minded racers and cruisers, or as part of a highly competitive race. But no matter how you go, the choice of a good sailing yacht lies at the foundation of a safe and enjoyable crossing.

What does a boat need for a transatlantic crossing?

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

If you choose to do your transatlantic crossing with a rally or race, you’ll have to meet a stringent list of required equipment and safety checks. That’s easier because you have the lists right in front of you, and a team of inspectors to check your work. Preparing for a crossing with just one boat, the captain has to take all the responsibility and know what to check.

Sailing across the Atlantic is a serious undertaking, and you will sail out of range of shore-based rescue and into rapidly changing and possibly severe weather systems. You will have several thousand miles of nonstop sailing and may be at sea for several weeks.

What you must have

Any boat sailing across the Atlantic needs solid construction and a sound rig, a reliable auxiliary engine, and enough stores for food and water for the crew. That’s a bare minimum. Every boat needs to be checked from stem to stern to make sure systems are reliable, many older boats can certainly make this trip, and not every new boat is suitable.

Some tiny boats have crossed the Atlantic, so minimum size isn’t a requirement. What successful boats have in common is a solid hull and rig, with reliable sails and systems.

Most transatlantic yachts have a lot more

You can cross the oceans with a lightly equipped boat with few conveniences or extra safety gear, but most do not. A few things to look for on your boat include:

  • An EPIRB satellite rescue beacon .
  • Long range communication devices, such as satellite phones and single sideband radios.
  • Certified life raft with space for all crew on board.
  • Storm sails
  • Storm safety gear such as drogues or sea anchors.
  • Access to up-to-date weather forecasts and reports.

Do not head offshore without these

The list of required equipment for races and rallies is exhaustive, and many of the requirements are exacting and expensive. No one is enforcing compliance when you sail on your own. But there are a few things you should not head offshore without.

  • A reliable auxiliary engine. If the wind dies and you need to dodge bad weather, this can be a lifesaver.
  • Access to good, current weather information.
  • Reliable sails. Have all sails inspected by a sailmaker for wear and damage before setting out.
  • A life raft. If you run into serious problems and lose your boat, this is your last hope for rescue.
  • Spare parts and tools for common repairs.

Read also: 10 Sailing Myths And Bad Advice You Shouldn’t Listen To

What experience do you need to do a transatlantic?

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

A transatlantic crossing is a major sailing milestone for experienced sailors. The north Atlantic is no place for new sailors and beginners, unless they’re with competent and experienced crew or a qualified captain.

If you’re thinking of a transatlantic crossing on your own, you’ll need experience with multi-day, nonstop passages. Sailing offshore is twenty-four hours a day and nonstop, there’s no place to park. Experience with night sailing, standing watches, navigation, provisioning, and basic engine and system troubleshooting are all a must.

Read also: Five Easy Beginners-Friendly Sailing Trips And Destinations

Chartering a yacht – a great option for less experienced sailors.

Charter fleets make seasonal moves from Europe to the Caribbean are an excellent way to get offshore sailing experience. Charter companies provide a captain and first mate, but you can reserve a spot and fill the roles of a full crew member, standing watch and sailing far offshore.

Many boats are also available for charter in cruising rallies, races, and deliveries. You’ll need to hire a captain with the needed offshore experience, but you may come away with enough experience to skipper your own yacht the next time.

The best yachts for a transatlantic crossing

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

There are many yachts which are suitable for a transatlantic passage. Some will be less expensive, some will be more comfortable, faster, or better suited to you, your experience, and your budget.

NEEL 51: Fast and easy to sail trimaran

The NEEL 51 is a fast, comfortable trimaran suited to a smaller crew. It’s spacious, but easy to handle while putting up double digit speeds and 200+ mile days. Trimarans can be a little more sea-kindly in waves and chop than catamarans, and don’t heel hard like monohulls. A protected helm station gives great protection offshore and good visibility, and there space on board for plenty of crew and guests.

The racing version of the NEEL 51 is built with lighter materials, and features a larger rig to project more sail area for more speed, while still affording the same luxury and comfort at anchor.

More info about our Neel 51 available for charter

Outremer 5X: High-speed catamaran sailing

The Outremer 5X offers top tier performance and comfort in a single passage. Sustaining double digit speeds with east, the Outremer 5X is one of the fastest cruising catamarans on the market. Outremer is known for both performance and quality, and your transatlantic trip will be fast and safe.

With four different helm stations, she’s a sailing boat foremost. It’s designed for a small crew, even when tearing up the ocean on a fast passage. With options for three or four cabins and a cockpit that can fit a dozen people, she’ll be as comfortable when you arrive as she is fast on passage.

Hallberg-Rassy 57: Sturdy monohull with elegance and speed

Hallberg-Rassy builds tough cruising yachts, and the 57 is no exception. While monohulls don’t put up the blistering speeds you’ll find in multihulls, the Hallberg-Rassy 57 is no slouch and can log 200 mile days. Most offshore sailing and cruising is done in monohulls, and blue water sailors love their stability and seakindliness across all conditions.

The Hallberg-Rassy 57 has generous accommodations, and loads of capacity for gear supplies. The deck layout is clear, and lines and controls are laid out for easy use with a small crew. With a performance design by German Frers, the 57 sails well on all points of sail.

There are many choices for the best boat for you for a transatlantic crossing. No matter which boat you choose for your transatlantic and how you go – on your own, or on a charter – preparation is key. Your boat needs to be equipped with a full range of safety gear, and checked from top to bottom so you know your sails, hull, and engines will get you where you’re going.

Read also: The Caribbean To Mediterranean Sailing Routes: How To Cross The Atlantic Eastward

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Preparing to cross the Atlantic

OY565 190617 BCR 149

We always encourage the Oyster Family to explore and achieve new sailing experiences. And completing an Atlantic crossing is the dream of many a sailor. But the sea can be a formidable mistress so it pays to prepare well, making sure everything is ship shape before a longer ocean passage, right down to the last sail tie. Oyster Crew member Leandra Sewell details how she and her crewmates prepare for an Atlantic crossing aboard their Oyster Yacht.

PROVISIONING

I don’t need to explain why taking the right foods for a longer sailing trip is so important, but here is a quick guide to the provisions we take:

- The number one rule is to take foods that will keep for a long time. Dry store goods – tinned foods, pasta sauce, cup-a-soups, crackers, tea, coffee, cereals, bread flour, long-life milk and water; not forgetting easy to grab snacks such as nuts, dried fruit, cereal bars, chocolates, biscuits, crisps. Baking ingredients let you cook on the move, and who doesn’t love finishing a night watch to the smell of freshly baked bread?

- Fresh fruit and vegetables that keep well and can be kept out the fridge for a long period are important. Apples, oranges, pears, grapefruit, unripened avocados, unripened bananas, pineapple, mango, watermelon, carrots, corn, potatoes, onions, pumpkin, celery and peppers all fall into this list. When planning meals, it’s important to work around when this produce will start to go off so nothing is wasted.

- Frozen foods are great too, so fresh produce is available throughout the passage. We take frozen vegetables, frozen berries and other fruit that can be thrown in a smoothie. Meat and ready-made pizzas are good and bread can also be frozen and toasted easily.

- Don’t forget – anti-seasickness provisions like ginger biscuits, ginger and peppermint teas, and mints are essential, although hopefully not necessary!

FOOD PREPARATION

Our chef will prepare three meals a day for seven people for +/- 16 days, which is the average time it takes us to sail across the Atlantic. Below are some handy hints from how our chef does this: 

- Fruit and vegetables are cut up, portioned and frozen for future use.

- Some dishes are made in advance and frozen – these include lasagne, pies, stews, curries, chilli and soups.

- Wrap fresh herbs and leaves in damp paper towels to make them last longer.

- Home-made dips like hummus are preprepared and we continue to prepare foods like this as we sail.

SAFETY DRILLS

It is important everyone knows their responsibilities in case of an emergency. So we run through all our safety checks and drills to pick up anything that might be amiss before we leave.

- Life jackets must be checked for wear and tear.

- Locations of safety equipment are identified and we remove all the covers and run through how everything works. 

- We test the alarms and emergency exits.

- We do a full run through of fire, man overboard and abandon ship drills.

MECHANICAL CHECKS

- We test all the alarms including fire and bilge alarms.

- Start up the generators and engine to make sure they run smoothly.

- Winches and hydraulics are all tested.

- Service intervals on machinery are checked.

- The bow and stern thrusters are tested to ensure a smooth take off once we slip the lines.

DECK CHECKS

Not only do we have the fishing rods ready to supplement our diet with fresh and sustainably caught fish, but we also needed to check the following: 

- the jack-stays have been set up and tested to ensure they are tight.

- winches have been set up with the correct lines.

-  the stainless steel is polished to protect it from the salt water and do a final wash down.

- all hatches are stowed and locked close, ready to go to sea!

Want to get a feel for the Atlantic Crossing experience?

READ THE ATLANTIC CROSSING BLOG >

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How to sail across the Atlantic and back

Elaine Bunting

  • Elaine Bunting
  • March 8, 2021

Confined to quarters during the pandemic, many sailors are itching to slip their lines and sail for the sun. Elaine Bunting explains exactly how to break free and sail across the Atlantic and back

A yacht sailing over the horizon

If your dream is sailing off into the sunset, making it a reality could be easier than you think

Just as the island of Hiddensee drew across the wake of the boat, Malin Andersson took up her camera and shot a video, writes Elaine Bunting .

When she looks at it now, a late summer scene from the Baltic coast of Germany, she remembers it as the instant she knew for certain she was right to think of leaving work to go cruising.

Malin and her partner Kaj Maass, both from Sweden and aged in their late twenties, met as students and formed a plan to take a year off before starting a family.

After years of scrimping, they bought a Bavaria 38 and renamed her Cross Ocean .

With the last tiny island of a summer cruise behind them, they began to prepare to sail across the Atlantic and back, and a year of adventure.

‘From then, we have never had a moment of regret about setting off,’ she says.

Each year, hundreds of yachtsmen of all ages sail across the Atlantic.

Some have only a few months of freedom, others plan to cruise indefinitely.

Their ambitions shape diverse choices in terms of boat design and preparations.

Here, we look at some of the biggest considerations if that is your goal, too.

What’s the right boat to sail across the Atlantic?

A good place to start might be with the question: can I sail across the Atlantic and back in the yacht I have now?

In most cases, the answer is yes.

Almost any well-prepared yacht of 30ft and upwards can tackle the downwind crossing, and indeed there is no reason why an even smaller boat can’t do it successfully.

People have crossed in Folkboats; the legendary American sailor Webb Chiles sailed across the Pacific in a converted 24ft dayboat, and some masochistic adventurers have crossed oceans in micro yachts not even long enough for them to stretch out in.

Two sailors I have repeatedly met over the years are Swedes Pekka and Barbro Karlsson.

They first crossed the Atlantic in 1986 in their 32ft Arvid Lauren-designed double-ender, Corona AQ .

A woman and two men sitting on the deck of their yacht

Pekka and Barbo Karisson have sailed their 32ft double ender across the Atlantic multiple times over 30 years. Credit: World Cruising Club

Over the last 30 years, they have made multiple crossings back and forth, observing boats getting ever larger, even of the same LOA as theirs.

By comparison, theirs is dwarfed in every dimension, including beam and freeboard, yet it has everything this experienced couple need for living on board for six or more months every year.

So, really, it is a matter of cost, preference and expectation.

The big question is whether your current yacht is the best tool for the job given your budget.

Is it large enough for the crew you intend for longer passages, for the provisions, fuel and water?

A 35-footer might take 25-28 days to sail across the Atlantic from the Canaries to the West Indies.

Obviously, the longer and faster your boat is, the more stowage and water tankage you will have for less time at sea.

You might also ask yourself which parts of the adventure are the most valuable to you.

You will need a solid yacht to sail across the Atlantic

A solid yacht set up for bluewater cruising is a good option and can be sold once you return home. Credit: Tor Johnson

If you don’t intend to do the more arduous return home to Europe, maybe you don’t need a bigger, more expensive, more complex long-legged bluewater cruiser; you could consider shipping back – more on that option later.

If you intend to live on board for longer, then perhaps you will want more space, including for guests, greater comforts and faster passage times.

In that case, one solution might be to buy for the duration of the project a second-hand bluewater cruiser already well kitted out with the right gear, then sell her right afterwards.

‘I think that makes total sense,’ says Sue Grant, managing director of Berthon International, the well-known brokers specialising in bluewater cruisers.

‘The best thing you can do for a North Atlantic circuit is to buy from the guy who had the dream, had the money and didn’t go. A refit will always cost you more than you think.’

For a two- to three-season transocean cruise, Grant advocates stretching up to your next level, especially to a yacht that doesn’t need a big refit and brands with a strong residual value.

‘If you buy a high-quality Hallberg-Rassy or an Oyster then sell it you’d lose 10% of value but have three years for it.’

Buy a boat you will enjoy

While in the Azores in 2012 I met Stuart and Anne Letton, who were sailing their Island Packet 45, Time Bandit , back to the UK.

Their boat was brimming with sensible ideas for living aboard and I have kept in touch with them over the years as they are a wonderful source of thoughtful advice.

Since then they have sold the Island Packet , bought an Outremer 51 catamaran, sailed across the Atlantic again, and are presently in Indonesia having sailed across the Pacific.

In total, they have now logged a very impressive 60,000 miles.

A couple on the trampoline of their catamaran

Catamarans are increasingly popular thanks to their speed and space. Credit: Stuart & Anne Letton

‘Before we went cruising, I spent a lot of time looking at what would be the best, safest mode of transport. I wanted a proven, tough, sturdy, bombproof ocean cruiser, hence Time Bandit [the Island Packet], the “Beige Battleship”,’ says Stuart.

‘Having spent my sailing career racing performance dinghies and keel boats, this was something of a departure for me. It was safe. And a bit boring. However, the reality is you all end up in the same place, give or take a few days. With reflection, though, I’d say, buy a boat that will make you happy, one that reflects your sailing style and capabilities. We opted for slow but safe and used the safe features a handful of days in 10 years. Those were years we could have been enjoying more rewarding sailing.

‘Buy what you will enjoy, can afford and are able to keep running. Do the maths on running costs, rig, insurance and repairs, and work that into the budget.’

Asked about their ideas of the ideal size for a couple, the Lettons comment: ‘Generally I’d say bigger is better, but the costs are exponential. Personally, for two up, I think around 40-45ft feet is a good size: big enough to be safe and comfortable, small enough to manage.’

Tips on how to sail across the Atlantic from Stuart & Anne Letton

The couple own the Outremer 51, Time Bandit and have completed four Atlantic crossings and sailed 60,000 miles

Stuart and Anne Letton

Stuart and Anne Letton.

‘Being very well set up for dead downwind sailing is important, especially well thought-out preventers, fore and aft on the spinnaker pole and main boom.

‘An asymmetric or spinnaker will keep you moving in lighter air.

‘Save on gas with a Thermal Cookpot and get as much free power from water and sun as you can.

‘Trade in your trusty CQR or Bruce anchor for a spade or similar “new technology” anchor .

Is a bigger boat better for crossing the Atlantic?

Like the Lettons, I think 40-45ft is something of a sweet spot, offering the volume and tankage required for longer cruising, yet still manageable by a small crew.

Bigger has its advantages, even up to 55ft (above that the loads become too large to handle manually and maintenance is a massive chore for a family crew, requiring significant time and budget).

The waterline length and extra speed will be your friend, most of the time.

Speed is your ally in evading bad weather, and if you are sailing to a schedule.

A yacht anchored in a bay with a palm tree

The Witt family sailed around the world as part of the World Cruising Club World ARC

Karsten Witt and his wife, Sheila, circumnavigated in the World ARC in their X-55 Gunvør XL , and he says: ‘It was hardest work for the smaller or slower boats. They are at sea longer, therefore experience more and sometimes harder weather, arrive later in port, get more tired and have less time to make repairs and bank downtime.

‘I would always go for a modern boat that’s faster,’ he adds.

‘If you had a heavy 40ft cruiser you would miss weather windows. Other boats spend days battling headwinds because they were doing 6-7 knots upwind and they couldn’t point. We averaged 200 miles a day every day, so in five days were a long way away and in completely different weather.’

But you certainly don’t need a large or expensive yacht, just a well-prepared one.

Starting with the basics: safety gear, fire and gas installations, good sails with deep reefs, in date and inspected rig, winches and all machinery serviced, and power and battery systems upgraded if necessary, plus full inspection of keel fastenings and rudder, skeg and bearings.

After that, you really need to know how everything on board works, how you’d repair or service it and, if you can’t, how you would manage without.

A crew on a yacht about to sail across the Atlantic on the ARC

Karsten and Sheila Witt and family enjoyed the extra pace and comfort of their X-55. Credit: World Cruising Club

Only after considering that is it worth adding complexity.

Multiple power generation systems, including hydro-generator and solar panels, watermakers, diesel generators and WiFi networks.

Mark Matthews is marine surveyor who ran Professional Yacht Deliveries for 12 years, a company that moves around 200 yachts and averages 350,000 miles a year.

When he made his own Atlantic crossing, it was in a 42ft production yacht.

‘We kept the original sail plan and sails and did not have a generator or other means of charging the batteries apart from the engine. We took bottled water to supplement the on-board tankage. We only invested in a secondhand satellite phone, jerrycans for additional fuel, fishing tackle, wind scoops for the West Indies and provisions for the crossing. We crossed from the Canaries to the West Indies in 17 days,’ he explains.

But if you are looking at a boat for the way back to Europe or outside the downwind routes of the tropics, maybe you should look at more conservative, heavier displacement types, he suggests.

A yacht for a one-way voyage?

The downwind Tradewinds crossing can really be tackled in any well-prepared boat large enough for your crew, so one way to look at an Atlantic circuit is to weigh up first how you feel about the way back home, and factor that into the cost equation.

A growing number of sailors spend the winter season in the sun, or several consecutive seasons between periods of work, then ship their boat back.

This on-off cruising lifestyle could be compatible with some remote working, so while extremely expensive in itself, shipping represents a trade-off that could be worth considering.

A yacht being craned onto a transporter ship

You may find a smaller boat adequate, especially if you are shipping it home. Credit: Neville Hockley

Minus requirements dictated by the longer, more windward crossing back home, perhaps you could go in a ‘one-way/downwind-only/island-hopping’ boat option.

That could be a much smaller boat, a lighter, simpler or more performance-orientated yacht.

A one-way voyage involves relatively short times at sea, possibly three weeks at most, and you might be able to manage without spending a fortune on equipment.

This year, Peters & May will be loading from Antigua, St Lucia and Martinique and have ships going into the Med, Southampton and other North Sea or Baltic ports.

Michael Wood, general manager of Peters & May, quotes typical prices of US$10,200 for a 32-footer and US$21,600 for a 41-footer.

Unlike a delivery service, shipping saves on the wear and tear from an Atlantic crossing, so is also something to weigh up.

Ready to go?

Typically, getting ready to go off for an Atlantic circuit or more needs a two- to three-year runway.

I have met people who have done it much quicker – I recently met an American family who only decided to go cruising last June and were in the Canary Islands with a brand new catamaran in November – but it is stressful, and you risk sailing away with a long list of warranty work needed, and jobs lists incomplete.

It might take most of a year to choose, trial and select the right boat, then you could spend the next year sailing from your home port, preparing, fitting new gear, testing and sea trialling everything and upping your knowledge level.

Kaj Maass and Malin Andersson, an engineer and a pre-school teacher respectively, bought their Bavaria 38 Cross Ocean in 2016 for €80,000 and lived on board for a summer and winter to increase their savings.

Provision on yacht ahead of the crew left to cross the Atlantic

You’ll need space to store enough food for the crew – though choice in foreign ports may be limited. Credit: Kaj Maass & Malin Andersson

‘You don’t have to set off for several years right away, you could make the adventure in smaller parts,’ says Kaj.

‘We met several sailors who sailed for a couple of months, left the boat, flew back home, and continued later on. We adjusted upgrades, the time frame for the adventure, and saved during our day-to-day lives before setting off.’

Do make sure everything you fit for your cruise is well-tested and problems ironed out before you set out to sail across the Atlantic.

If you buy a new boat, expect lots of snagging.

Sorry to say it, but yards tend to put switches, filters and so on in silly places, and because yachts have relatively low volume sales, information about fitting or installation problems can take a while to circle back and be corrected.

Some cruisers decide to replace their engine for peace of mind before leaving to cross the Atlantic

Kaj and Malin replaced their engine for peace of mind. Credit: Kaj Maass & Malin Andersson

If you leave before inevitable glitches are corrected, you could spend days arguing with the boatbuilder or manufacturer about who is responsible and how they are going to get spare parts to you.

This quickly rubs the nap off a dream cruising life.

A year of home-range cruising will also allow you to gain all the knowledge and training you need, which should include essential maintenance know-how and medical and sea survival training (people tend to rave about the latter, interestingly).

It will also allow you time to prepare a manual about your boat, with info and serial numbers and specs of everything on board, which will pay you back handsomely if you need advice or spares.

Tips on how to sail across the Atlantic from Kaj Maass & Malin Andersson

The couple own the Bavaria 38, Cross Ocean and have sailed from Sweden to the Caribbean and back via the Azores

A woman raised a flag on a yacht at the end of crossing the Atlantic

Malin hoists a courtesy flag as their Bavaria 38 makes landfall in St Lucia. Credit: Kaj Maass & Malin Andersson

‘You do not need that much. Less equipment equals fewer breakages.

‘We would never go without a windvane and we are definitely pleased with having a centre cockpit boat, which keeps you safe and dry in the centre of the boat, though the master cabin is worthless at sea.’

Go with the kids

There has been a big upswing in families taking a year or 18 months out from normal lives, to return later.

This seems to coincide with that point in an established, stable career where a sabbatical is possible, there is enough money to buy a boat for a special project, parents are healthy and the kids are not yet in the run up to major exams.

Most often, the sailing families I meet have children aged between five and 12.

A family on the deck of their yacht before they left to cross the Atlantic

Crossing an ocean with a family is entirely feasible. The Paterson family took part in the 2018 ARC on their Moody 471. Credit: World Cruising Club/James Mitchell

The obvious rewards for children spending every day with their mum and dad have to be weighed against the considerable extra work and commitment, though I have yet to meet a parent who regretted it.

In 2019, Russell and Kate Hall sailed across the Atlantic in their Hallberg-Rassy 46 with their boys, Hugo, 8, and Felix, 6.

‘Somebody said to us that living with kids on a boat for a year is like living on land with them for four years,’ Kate laughs.

‘It can be quite draining but it’s also part of the reason why we are doing this, so it’s the yin and yang.

School lessons kept the children from getting too bored during the crossing

Additional crew can help with sailing and school when you sail across the Atlantic. Credit: Erin Carey

‘There are jobs that require both of us and you have to rely on the children to keep themselves safe at times. They sleep really well on board and they go to bed at sunset and wake at sunrise, then they’re full of beans. You might not have had much sleep. It takes a while to adjust.’

The Halls concentrated on the basics of English and maths, and then tailored history or geography or science projects around places they were visiting.

This seems to work for most families.

Schools will usually provide a curriculum plan for time out, and there are a lot of distance learning and ‘school in a box’ courses for homeschooling children, such as Calvert and Oak Meadow.

‘My advice would be to be easy on yourself,’ advises Kate Hall.

Two children with a half way sign to mark the half way point of an ocean crossing

Celebrating milestones can help bolster a young crew’s morale when you sail across the Atlantic. Credit: Erin Carey

‘We started with five hours’ schooling a day and then reduced that to two-and-a-half. Chill and relax; it all works out. There are always things to learn.’

If you are planning to sail across the Atlantic with kids, look at taking on extra hands to help with the sailing.

Also consider joining the ARC rally where in port you share a pontoon with all the other family boats so there are lots of other kids of different ages for yours to socialise with, as well as an organised daily kids club.

The friendships made between adults and children also often shape later cruising plans.

Seasons and routes to sail across the Atlantic

If you are planning on sailing across the Atlantic, don’t leave it too late to set off across Biscay – late August or September is pushing your luck from a weather point of view.

Ideally, make the most of the summer cruising opportunities travelling south through France, Spain and Portugal – these could be among the best parts of the trip.

Annually, the ARC rally leaves the Canary Islands in November, the ARC+ heading for Mindelo in Cape Verde first, and the ARC direct to St Lucia.

This is so that crews can be in the Caribbean for Christmas.

A yacht set up with a preventer on the sail

White sails can make a solid downwind sail plan if well set up with preventers and guys

It is early in the season for Tradewinds, though, and you may have to be prepared for a trough, a front, or calms – or all three – on the way across unless you wait until January.

Whether you cross early or not, my own personal preference would be to go via Cape Verde.

It’s a fascinating archipelago and culture, a place to re-provision or make repairs, and it breaks up the crossing.

It lengthens the time away and overall distance, as Mindelo is 800 miles south- west of the Canaries, but the leg south into ‘butter melting’ latitudes will then put you into almost guaranteed Trades, even in November.

From the Caribbean, you can then sail up to Florida via the Bahamas, or the US East Coast, or return to Europe via the Azores.

Routes for sailing across the Atlantic

The routes to sail across the Atlantic and back. Credit: Maxine Heath

For the return to Europe, most cruisers generally strike out from Tortola in the British Virgin Islands or St Maarten, both good for provisioning, spares, chandlery and repairs, or head up to Bermuda and wait for a springboard forecast for Horta.

From here, crews will again wait to pick their timing to head across to Spain or Portugal or up to the UK.

According to Jimmy Cornell, author of World Cruising Routes , as early as March and as late as mid-May there are reasonable chances of favourable south-easterly and south-westerly winds on leaving the Eastern Caribbean.

The advice he offers is to track north-easterly towards the Azores and stay south of 30°N until 40°W.

For cruisers a southerly route is generally the preferable passage to choose, staying south of the Gulf Stream in lighter winds and taking on extra fuel and motoring if conditions deem necessary.

How much will it cost to sail across the Atlantic and back?

Cruising costs will depend on how you wish to live while cruising.

If you want to spend time in marinas, eat out regularly, hire cars, take tours and fly home occasionally, obviously that will be different to a more self-contained life on board at anchor.

As a guide, we asked Swedish couple Kaj and Malin to add up their costs to prepare for their trip and during the 14-month sabbatical.

A yacht at anchor in an anchorage

Costs will be much lower where you can stay at anchor rather than berth in a marine. Credit: Kaj Maass/Malin Andersson

‘The budget for our trip was €80,000 to buy the boat, and €30,000 of upgrades,’ Kaj says.

The upgrades included a new engine, new standing rigging, a Hydrovane and satellite communications.

They dropped the rudder and the keel and reinforced the area around it.

Of the total budget, around €10,000 was spent on safety equipment.

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Their cruising costs were around €2,500 a month for the two of them, averaging out the most expensive parts of the journey from Sweden to the Canary Islands, when harbour fees were costing around €40 a night.

This would cover some eating out ashore and car rental for tours.

Over the longer term, a good rule of thumb is to allow 20% of the cost of your boat for running repairs to cover antifouling, sail replacement, servicing and, if you are leaving your boat to return home, you’ll need to factor in haul-out, storage and hurricane tie-downs.

If you plan to buy a boat, sail it back and sell it right after your trip, however, you may be able sidestep some ongoing costs.

Cutting the cord

Maybe you don’t have to wait until retirement to go cruising.

There is a strong argument for taking a career break (or breaks) and working for longer if necessary as it spreads the cost and reduces the risk of the big adventure never happening.

Two yachts with white sails sailing

Additional offwind sails, like a furling Code 0, can keep the boat moving in light airs for more enjoyable sailing and to save fuel. Credit World Cruising Club

Around half of the people I meet on transatlantic rallies are taking sabbaticals and intending to return to the same post, or have quit a job.

Both options have become quite acceptable, and in some professions and countries sabbaticals are actively encouraged as a retention incentive.

‘Tell the world you are leaving,’ advises Kaj Maass.

‘Make sure you create some pressure on yourself to realise your dream. Involve your employer early on in the planning process. A modern employer will understand and respect your decision to explore the world and live out your dreams, maybe they even see a long-term benefit from the knowledge and experience you will gain from it and you can [negotiate] a leave of absence.’

A satellite phone on the deck of yacht

Satellite comms add a level of safety and keeping in touch but can be costly. Credit: Richard Langdon/Ocean Images

Those running a business may bring in a trusted general manager or step up a family member while they are away.

Keeping tabs on business while away is possible (though it can be expensive in satellite data) but it’s not something that generally works well on a day-to-day basis.

You do need to be able to cut the ties to enjoy cruising, not least because the cruising life comes with its own workload, from maintenance to laundry.

A man carrying out maintenance on his yacht

Long-distance cruising comes with its own workload and maintenance. Credit: Kaj Maass/Malin Andersson

‘Trying to mix work and pleasure compromises both,’ says Stuart Letton.

Before setting out, the Lettons brought their son in to run their web-based business supplying global brands with customisable marketing material.

‘While our business was under new management, it was still a struggle for me to let go. I can remember sitting in WiFi cafés from Spain to the Galapagos trying to blend cruising with work and, while it helped my conscience, I doubt the effort did much for work or cruising.

‘That’s not to say it isn’t possible. With good WiFi and satellite connections you really can work pretty much anywhere . But if you don’t need to, I’d cut the ties, burn the bridges and go. If you need to work, fine, just get your management team in place, communication systems properly set up and resourced, and go.’

Two yachts anchored in St Lucia

It helps to set a deadline so you can realise your dream and sail across the Atlantic. Credit: Kaj Maass/Malin Andersson

However you plan to break free, what really helps is a deadline: a date that you are going set off, with a scene you can visualise to keep you motivated as you work through the preparations and demands of shore life.

Most preparations are really just logistics, and you’re probably already pretty good at that.

The bigger obstacle is often mustering the courage to leave.

I often hear cruisers describe hassles – one described cruising as the act of sailing from one place where you couldn’t get something fixed to another where you hoped you would – yet when I ask for their best advice it usually boils down to a simple prescription: just go.

Kaj Maass said exactly that when I asked him that question.

‘Just do it. Life is too short not to live out your dreams.’

To rally or not?

This is entirely a personal choice.

Advantages of the ARC , which is the best organised and biggest, are great seminars, preparation information and tools.

It’s also an ideal way to meet lots of fascinating, like-minded people, and is agreed to be good value despite costs.

It also gives you a departure date to hold yourself too.

The ARC fleet leaving the Canary Islands

For a first taste of ocean sailing, it can be reassuring and fun to join a rally to sail across the Atlantic, like the ARC. Credit: James Mitchell/World Cruising Club

Plus is has good parties and entertainment on tap to keep crew happy.

The cons would be its early crossing date for the Tradewinds season, large fleet size (though check out ARC+, which is smaller) or if you just want to be low-key and go it alone.

The Viking Explorers rally is one alternative, but not many others still run.

If you do your own thing, you will still find a wonderful cruising community anywhere cruisers other, and there is fantastic support across the world for independent voyaging through the Ocean Cruising Club.

Preparations for sailing across the Atlantic  – the basics

While in no way a comprehensive list of preparations, here are some jumping off points to think about when planning your voyage:

  • Learn how to service and maintain your engine and key machinery, have a good set of tools on board. Video repair tips and techniques when you have technicians on board to refer to later.
  • Have your yacht lifted, antifouled , stern gear serviced, and anodes replaced. Consider fitting a rope cutter . Also check steering systems and replace rudder bearings.
  • Create a boat manual with all your procedures, equipment and the location of safety and medical equipment for crew to access.
  • Fit an autopilot capable of handling your yacht in an ocean swell, fully laden downwind in 30 knots of breeze. Have a back-up if shorthanded, or two separate systems for redundancy.
  • Have power systems checked and replace or upgrade batteries if necessary . If you upgrade batteries, consider if additional charging is necessary .
  • Get first-class safety equipment for all crew on board.
  • Have all sails serviced by a sail loft and consider double stitching all panels. With slab reefing mainsails, get a deep third reef.
  • Set up a good boom preventer for downwind sailing on both tacks. That can be just lines and blocks but set up so you can gybe and switch preventers without leaving the cockpit.
  • Check all running rigging and ensure you have adequate spare halyards set up before you depart. Think about chafe prevention.
  • Choose your crew carefully. Make sure you are all comfortable sailing together and that roles are established well before you leave.

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Crossing the Atlantic on a Yacht in Comfort

Experienced cruisers often discover Kadey-Krogen Yachts because they begin to search for yachts capable of crossing the Atlantic. If one searches the listings for Transatlantic boats for sale or contacts a broker with a very specific request to hear about yachts that can cross the Atlantic, they’re bound to discover plenty of superyachts, and some custom trawlers, and, of course, a selection of our models that are built to take on long bluewater cruising legs such as one takes on for an ocean crossinig.

Those who are more serious about open-ocean crossings begin to think about the best time to cross the Atlantic west to east and also consider provisioning, crew, a timetable, potential destinations, and all the factors, large and small, that enter into this exciting equation.

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Sail Away Blog

Time to Cross the Atlantic by Sailboat: A Comprehensive Guide

Alex Morgan

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Crossing the Atlantic by sailboat is a thrilling and challenging adventure that requires careful planning and preparation. The duration of the crossing can vary depending on several factors. To provide you with a better understanding, let’s delve into the details.

The Atlantic crossing refers to the journey of sailing across the Atlantic Ocean from one continent to another. It is a significant achievement for sailors and offers a unique experience of being surrounded by vast open waters for an extended period.

Several factors come into play when determining the duration of an Atlantic crossing. These factors include:

The chosen route significantly impacts the duration of the journey. Sailors can opt for the trade wind route, northern Atlantic route, or southern Atlantic route, each offering different challenges and opportunities.

The type and size of the sailboat also affect the duration. Factors such as speed, stability, and design of the sailboat contribute to the overall performance during the crossing.

Weather conditions, including wind patterns, currents, storms, and calms, play a crucial role in determining the speed and progress of the sailboat. Unpredictable weather can lengthen the crossing.

The skill and experience of the crew members onboard influence the efficiency of sailing maneuvers, navigation, and decision-making. A well-prepared and experienced crew can optimize the sailing process.

There are three main routes commonly used for crossing the Atlantic by sailboat:

The trade wind route follows the prevailing easterly winds, known as the trade winds. This route takes advantage of consistent winds and is the most popular and direct route for sailors.

The northern Atlantic route involves sailing closer to the polar regions, taking advantage of the prevailing westerly winds. This route allows for unique experiences and challenges due to colder temperatures and potentially hazardous weather conditions.

The southern Atlantic route involves sailing closer to the equator, where winds are often weaker and the crossing requires careful navigation. This route offers opportunities for exploring tropical areas but can be challenging due to unpredictable weather patterns.

The duration of an Atlantic crossing varies depending on the chosen route, weather conditions, and sailboat performance. On average:

The trade wind route typically takes around 18 to 21 days to complete.

The northern Atlantic route can vary from 15 to 30 days , depending on weather conditions and specific route choices.

The southern Atlantic route can take anywhere from 20 to 40 days due to weaker winds and potentially longer distances.

To ensure a successful and safe Atlantic crossing, consider the following tips:

Thoroughly plan the route, provisions, fuel, and necessary equipment. Adequate preparation is key to a smooth voyage.

Stay updated on weather forecasts and make informed decisions based on the expected conditions. Anticipating and avoiding adverse weather can contribute to a safer crossing.

Establish reliable means of communication with shore and other vessels. Regular contact can provide essential support and updates during the journey.

Check and maintain all safety equipment, including life jackets, life rafts, EPIRBs, and fire extinguishers. Safety should always be the top priority.

By understanding the factors influencing the duration, choosing the right route, and following safety guidelines, sailors can embark on a remarkable Atlantic crossing experience.

##Key takeaways:

Key takeaway:

  • The duration of crossing the Atlantic by sailboat depends on various factors including the route chosen, type of sailboat, weather conditions, and skill of the crew.
  • There are three main routes for crossing the Atlantic by sailboat: the Trade Wind Route, the Northern Atlantic Route, and the Southern Atlantic Route.
  • The average duration of crossing the Atlantic varies according to the chosen route, with the Trade Wind Route being the fastest.
  • Tips for a successful and safe Atlantic crossing include proper planning and preparation, monitoring weather conditions, maintaining good communication, and ensuring the availability of safety equipment.

What Is the Atlantic Crossing?

The Atlantic Crossing , also known as sailing across the Atlantic Ocean , is a challenging voyage that requires careful planning and preparation. Factors such as the route chosen , the type of sailboat used , weather conditions , and crew experience all play a role in this adventure.

The route for the Atlantic Crossing depends on the time of year and weather patterns. There are various popular routes to choose from, including the Trade Wind Route , the Northern Atlantic Route , and the Southern Atlantic Route . Each route presents its own set of challenges and advantages.

The choice of sailboat impacts the duration of the journey. It’s important to consider factors such as the size, stability, and performance capabilities of the sailboat . As weather conditions along the route can change rapidly, the type of sailboat can affect crossing speed and overall safety.

Having a skilled and experienced crew is crucial for a successful Atlantic Crossing . They must possess essential skills including navigation , sailing techniques , safety procedures , and emergency preparedness . With a knowledgeable and experienced crew , the journey can be made smoother and safer.

Factors Affecting the Duration of Atlantic Crossing

Planning an Atlantic crossing by sailboat? Get ready to explore the factors that impact the duration of this incredible journey. From the chosen route and type of sailboat, to the ever-changing weather conditions and the skill of the crew, each variable plays a crucial role in the time it takes to traverse the vastness of the Atlantic. So, grab your compass and chart, as we dive into the elements that shape the ultimate adventure across the open seas.

When planning an Atlantic crossing by sailboat, choosing the right route is crucial in determining the duration of your journey. Here are the steps to consider when deciding on the best route:

1. Research the Trade Wind This is the most popular and direct route across the Atlantic. It takes advantage of the steady easterly winds, also known as the trade winds.

2. Explore the Northern Atlantic Set sail north towards Iceland and then turn east to avoid the doldrums and harness the powerful westerly winds.

3. Consider the Southern Atlantic Head south towards the Canary Islands and then catch the trade winds to cross the Atlantic. While this route is longer, it offers a more enjoyable downwind passage.

4. Assess the weather conditions: Examine weather patterns and forecasts to determine which route will have the most favorable conditions during your planned crossing.

5. Evaluate the sailboat’s capabilities and speed: Take into account factors such as size, design, equipment, and performance under different wind conditions.

6. Factor in the crew’s skill and experience: Their ability to handle various sailing conditions and make strategic decisions will influence the choice of route and overall duration.

7. Choose the route that aligns with your goals and preferences: Consider the desired level of challenge, the sights along the way, and any specific destinations you want to reach.

By carefully considering these factors, you can determine the optimal route for your Atlantic crossing, ensuring a safe and successful journey.

Type of Sailboat

The type of sailboat is crucial when planning an Atlantic crossing. Various sailboats have different capabilities and features that impact the duration of the journey. Factors to take into account when selecting a sailboat for an Atlantic crossing include:

  • Size: Larger sailboats offer more comfort and stability, but may require a larger crew and more resources. The size also affects the boat’s ability to handle harsh weather conditions.
  • Design: The design of the sailboat influences its speed, maneuverability, and stability. Some sailboats are specifically designed for long-distance voyages and ocean crossings, featuring a full keel for stability and a cutter rig for versatility.
  • Sail Configuration: The configuration of the sails, including the number and type, affects performance in different wind conditions. Certain sailboats have a single mast with a mainsail and jib, while others have multiple masts and various sail combinations.
  • Equipment: On-board equipment, such as navigation systems, autopilot, and safety gear, enhances crew safety and efficiency during the crossing. It is vital to choose a sailboat that is equipped with the necessary systems and equipment for a successful journey.
  • Construction: The construction materials and methods used for building the sailboat impact its durability and seaworthiness. Common materials include fiberglass, aluminum, and steel, each with their own advantages and considerations.
  • Experience: The experience and skill level of the crew are crucial when handling the sailboat during an Atlantic crossing. It is important to choose a sailboat that matches the crew’s level of experience and expertise.

Considering these factors helps in determining the best sailboat for a safe and successful Atlantic crossing.

Weather Conditions

When crossing the Atlantic by sailboat, weather conditions are crucial.

1. Wind: Sailors rely on favorable wind to make progress. Strong and consistent trade winds, blowing from east to west, are ideal.

2. Storms and hurricanes: Weather systems in the Atlantic can be unpredictable and potentially dangerous. Sailors need to be aware of the hurricane season and avoid storm-prone regions. Monitoring forecasts and navigating around adverse weather is essential for safety.

3. Sea states and waves: The Atlantic Ocean can have large swells and waves, especially during storms. Sailors need to be prepared and have a capable boat.

4. Fog and visibility: Fog impairs visibility and makes navigation challenging. Sailors must be cautious and have radar and navigation aids for safe navigation.

5. Ocean currents: The Atlantic has various currents that can help or hinder progress. Knowledge of these currents, like the Gulf Stream, helps sailors plan routes efficiently.

Understanding current and forecasted weather conditions is crucial for a successful and safe Atlantic crossing. Sailors should consult weather charts, use modern forecasting tools, and consider professional meteorologists. By considering weather conditions, sailors can optimize their route, adjust their sail plan, and ensure a smoother crossing.

Skill and Experience of the Crew

The success and safety of an Atlantic crossing by sailboat heavily rely on the skill and experience of the crew. Their expertise can have a significant impact on the duration of the journey, as a well-trained and experienced crew is capable of navigating more efficiently. Let’s explore the various aspects where the crew’s skill and experience come into play.

Firstly, navigation plays a vital role in determining the duration of the crossing. With their expertise and experience, a skilled crew can choose the most efficient routes, avoiding unnecessary detours and delays. By making informed decisions, they can optimize the sailing path, ultimately reducing the overall time taken.

The crew’s sailing techniques are crucial in maximizing speed and efficiency. An experienced crew knows the most effective techniques to employ, allowing them to harness the wind’s power and propel the sailboat forward swiftly. By implementing these proven methods, they can cover more distance in a shorter amount of time.

In the event of emergency situations, the crew’s experience becomes invaluable. With their knowledge and practice, they can quickly and effectively handle unforeseen circumstances, minimizing disruptions and delays. Their ability to remain calm and composed during such situations ensures that the journey remains on track, preventing any unnecessary setbacks.

Effective crew coordination is another key factor in a successful Atlantic crossing. Through clear communication and mutual support, the crew can ensure smooth operations and timely decision-making. This cohesion fosters an environment where everyone understands their roles and responsibilities, enabling efficient teamwork and the ability to adapt to changing circumstances.

It is important to note that crew members must undergo appropriate training and gain experience in various sailing conditions before attempting an Atlantic crossing. By building their skills and experience through shorter voyages and training programs, they can enhance their confidence and proficiency. This cultivation of competence and capability ensures the crew is well-prepared for the challenges they may face during the journey across the Atlantic.

Routes for Crossing the Atlantic by Sailboat

Looking to set sail across the vast Atlantic by sailboat? Let’s explore the numerous routes available for this incredible adventure. From the renowned Trade Wind Route to the lesser-known Northern and Southern Atlantic Routes, each option offers its own unique challenges and rewards. Whether you seek steady winds or a more adventurous path, these sub-sections will unveil the secrets and possibilities of each route, helping you plan your epic journey across the Atlantic Ocean.

Trade Wind Route

The Trade Wind Route is a popular route for crossing the Atlantic by sailboat. Sailors on this route can take advantage of the consistent easterly trade winds in the subtropical regions. These winds are caused by temperature differences and the Earth’s rotation.

The trade winds on this route typically blow at speeds of 10 to 25 knots , occasionally gusting stronger. Sailors can expect a smooth journey with smaller waves and less challenging weather compared to other routes.

The duration of the Atlantic crossing varies based on factors such as boat size , type, crew experience , and weather conditions. On average, it takes 14 to 21 days to complete this crossing.

To navigate the Trade Wind Route successfully, sailors should plan, prepare, monitor weather conditions, maintain communication, and ensure safety equipment is in place . Following these guidelines ensures a safe and enjoyable crossing.

Northern Atlantic Route

The Northern Atlantic Route is a popular sailboat route between Europe and North America . It offers an adventurous journey across the Atlantic Ocean .

Factors to consider when taking the Northern Atlantic Route include:

– Route Distance: The route covers approximately 2,800 nautical miles .

– Weather Conditions: The Northern Atlantic can have unpredictable weather with variable winds and potential storms. Sailors need to be prepared for adverse conditions and strong currents .

– Strong Currents : The North Atlantic Drift is a strong eastward-flowing current that can affect the progress of sailors. It is important to consider these currents when planning the route and timings.

– Potential Hazards: Icebergs are a potential hazard, especially in the Labrador Sea . It is crucial to be aware of these hazards and navigate safely around them.

– Duration: The duration of the journey can vary depending on factors such as weather conditions, boat size and speed, and crew experience. On average, it takes between 15 to 25 days to complete the journey.

When planning a sailboat journey on the Northern Atlantic Route , sailors should carefully consider the distance, weather conditions, strong currents, potential hazards, and expected duration. Adequate preparation, monitoring of weather conditions, and good communication are essential for a safe and successful crossing.

Southern Atlantic Route

The Southern Atlantic Route is a popular choice for sailors crossing the Atlantic. It offers a unique experience compared to other routes.

1. Strong Trade Winds: The route experiences strong and consistent trade winds blowing from the southeast. These winds provide favorable conditions for sailing and can increase speed.

2. Great Circle Route: The Southern Atlantic Route follows the shortest distance between two points on a globe. This allows for a more direct and efficient path, reducing the duration of the crossing.

3. Warmer Climate: Sailing along this route means encountering a warmer climate compared to northern routes. The waters are generally calmer, making it a more comfortable journey.

4. Wildlife and Scenic Views: Sailors have the opportunity to witness diverse marine life and enjoy picturesque views. Dolphins, whales, and other marine creatures are often spotted along the way.

5. Possible Stopover: Some sailors choose to make a stopover in Cape Verde , an archipelago off the coast of West Africa. This allows for a break in the journey and an opportunity to restock supplies.

The Southern Atlantic Route provides an exciting and challenging adventure for sailors. With its strong trade winds, shorter distance, and beautiful scenery, it is a popular choice for those seeking a memorable journey.

Average Duration of Atlantic Crossing

Ready to embark on a journey across the vast Atlantic? In this section, we’ll explore the average duration of an Atlantic crossing, providing insights into various routes such as the Trade Wind Route , Northern Atlantic Route , and Southern Atlantic Route . Discover the importance of proper planning, vigilant monitoring of weather conditions, effective communication, and ensuring essential safety equipment is in place. Get ready to set sail and unlock the secrets of crossing the Atlantic like a seasoned sailor.

The Trade Wind Route is a popular route for sailing across the Atlantic due to its favorable wind patterns. These winds, known as trade winds, blow from east to west in the tropics. The route starts from the Canary Islands and heads west towards the Caribbean or South America .

Sailing along the Trade Wind Route offers advantages. The trade winds provide consistent and steady winds, making it easier to maintain a good sailing speed. The route offers a smooth and comfortable passage with less rough seas compared to other routes. The Trade Wind Route allows sailors to take advantage of warm and pleasant weather conditions in the trade wind belt.

The time it takes to cross the Atlantic via the Trade Wind Route varies depending on factors such as sailboat size, speed, weather conditions, and crew experience. On average, it takes around 15 to 21 days to complete the crossing using this route. It’s important to note that these are rough estimates and actual crossing times can vary.

Fact: Some sailors have reported completing the Atlantic crossing via the Trade Wind Route in under two weeks, while others have taken over a month. The duration largely depends on the specific conditions encountered during the voyage.

The Northern Atlantic Route is an important consideration for sailors planning to cross the Atlantic by sailboat. The duration of the crossing via this route is influenced by various factors. The route itself, sailing from Europe to North America, can be longer due to distance and prevailing wind and current patterns. The type of sailboat used also impacts the duration, as different boats have different speeds and capabilities. Weather conditions along the route, including storms, wind patterns, and currents, can significantly affect the crossing time. The skill and experience of the crew onboard also play a role in navigating the route efficiently. Sailors should carefully consider these factors for a safe and successful journey.

The Southern Atlantic Route is popular for sailboat crossings due to favorable weather conditions and reliable wind patterns. This route, also known as the Cape Town Route , starts from Europe or the Americas and heads south towards the Canary Islands . Sailors then continue southwest across the Atlantic Ocean towards their final destination in South America or South Africa .

The Southern Atlantic Route offers consistent trade winds and mild weather compared to other routes. The prevailing winds blow from the southeast, providing a steady breeze that helps propel the sailboat forward. This makes it easier to maintain a good average speed and complete the crossing efficiently.

The duration of the Southern Atlantic Route can vary depending on factors such as sailboat type, crew skill and experience, and specific weather conditions encountered. On average, the crossing from Europe to South America takes around 20 to 30 days, while the journey from Europe to South Africa typically takes around 25 to 35 days.

Sailors navigating the Southern Atlantic Route should be prepared for challenges posed by the open ocean, including unpredictable weather patterns, potential storms, and the need for self-sufficiency. It is crucial to plan and prepare adequately, monitor weather conditions constantly, maintain good communication, and ensure all safety equipment is in place for a successful and safe crossing.

The Southern Atlantic Route has been a preferred route for sailors for centuries, connecting Europe with Africa and South America . The route played a significant role in the Age of Discovery , facilitating the exchange of goods, ideas, and cultures between continents. Today, it continues to be a popular route for adventurous sailors seeking to experience the thrill and challenge of crossing the Atlantic Ocean by sailboat.

Tips for a Successful and Safe Atlantic Crossing

Add tips for a Successful and Safe Atlantic Crossing

Here are some tips for a successful and safe Atlantic crossing:

1. Plan your route carefully, considering weather patterns, currents, and potential hazards. Have charts, navigation equipment, and a reliable GPS system.

2. Prepare your boat by inspecting for wear or damage. Ensure all safety equipment, including life jackets, flares, and a well-maintained life raft, is in good working condition.

3. Stock up on essential supplies like non-perishable food, water, and fuel. Have enough provisions for the entire journey and extra reserves for emergencies or delays.

4. Stay informed about potential hazards or changes in weather conditions by communicating with other sailors and maritime authorities.

5. Develop a detailed sailing plan that includes rest cycles for the crew and potential stops for restocking supplies or refueling.

6. Ensure all crew members are experienced and prepared for the challenges. Conduct regular safety drills and assign specific roles and responsibilities.

7. Monitor weather conditions closely and be ready to alter course or adjust schedule if needed. Prioritize safety above all else.

By following these tips, you can increase your chances of a successful and safe Atlantic crossing.

Plan and Prepare Adequately

When planning and preparing for an Atlantic crossing by sailboat, it is important to plan and prepare adequately to ensure a successful and safe journey. Here are the key steps to follow:

  • Research the route: It is crucial to thoroughly research the different routes available for crossing the Atlantic, such as the Trade Wind Route, the Northern Atlantic Route, and the Southern Atlantic Route.
  • Check weather conditions: Monitor weather forecasts and have a clear understanding of the typical weather patterns along your chosen route. Take note of any potential storms or unfavorable conditions that may arise.
  • Prepare the sailboat: Before setting off, ensure that the sailboat is in good condition and equipped with all the necessary safety equipment. This includes life jackets, flares, a first aid kit, and emergency communication devices.
  • Stock up on supplies: Make a comprehensive list of essential provisions needed for the journey, including an ample supply of food, water, fuel, and spare parts. Calculate the amount needed based on the estimated duration of the crossing.
  • Create a navigation plan: Develop a detailed navigation plan that includes waypoints, potential stops, and alternative routes. Familiarize yourself with navigational charts and instruments to aid in navigation throughout the journey.

By following these steps and planning and preparing adequately , you can embark on your Atlantic crossing with confidence and peace of mind . Just like Christopher Columbus , who meticulously planned and prepared for his transatlantic voyage , you too can open up new horizons for exploration and have a smooth and safe journey.

Monitor Weather Conditions

When crossing the Atlantic by sailboat, it is crucial to monitor weather conditions for a safe and successful journey. Here are some key points to consider:

1. Check weather forecasts: Stay updated with the latest forecasts for your entire journey. Pay attention to wind patterns, storm systems, and potential hazards.

2. Use weather routing services: Subscribe to a specialized routing service tailored to your specific route. These services can help you navigate around unfavorable weather conditions.

3. Monitor weather systems: Keep a constant eye on changing weather systems, especially tropical storms or hurricanes that can pose a significant threat. Take appropriate measures to avoid these dangerous conditions.

4. Be aware of wind patterns: Understand the prevailing winds along your route for planning and optimizing your sailing strategy. Trade wind routes offer consistent winds for a faster crossing.

5. Consider swell and sea state: Besides wind conditions, pay attention to the sea state. Large swells and rough seas can affect your comfort and safety at sea.

By actively monitoring weather conditions during your Atlantic crossing, you can make informed decisions and adjust your plans accordingly. Remember, safety should always be the top priority.

Maintain Good Communication

Maintaining good communication is absolutely crucial during an Atlantic crossing by sailboat. It is of utmost importance as it guarantees the safety and seamless operation of the voyage.

To ensure effective communication, there are several key steps that need to be taken:

1. Establish clear communication protocols: It is essential to set up a system that allows crew members and the skipper to effectively communicate with each other. This can be achieved by using designated channels such as radios or walkie-talkies for conveying important messages.

2. Implement regular check-ins: Designate specific times for crew check-ins. This enables everyone to report their status, share vital information, and address any concerns that may arise.

3. Create a comprehensive communication plan: Develop a plan that outlines how to communicate with land-based support teams or coastguard services in case of emergencies. This plan should include contact information and the correct procedures to be followed.

4. Maintain good radio etiquette: It is crucial to adhere to proper radio protocols in order to ensure clear and concise communication. Utilize standard phrases and refrain from engaging in unnecessary chatter to prevent any confusion.

5. Utilize technology: Take advantage of modern communication devices, such as satellite phones, that provide reliable coverage even in remote areas. This will enable seamless communication throughout the entire journey.

It is important to remember that maintaining good communication is not solely about accurately conveying information. It also plays a vital role in fostering teamwork and creating a sense of security among the crew members. By communicating effectively, the crew can promptly respond to any changing conditions and thus ensure a safe and successful Atlantic crossing.

Ensure Safety Equipment is in Place

Ensuring safety equipment is crucial for a successful and safe Atlantic crossing by sailboat. Follow these steps:

  • Inspect and test all safety equipment before departure, including life jackets, harnesses, tethers, and personal locator beacons, to ensure safety equipment is in place.
  • Ensure the boat has proper navigation equipment, such as GPS, charts, and radar, for accurate navigation and to ensure safety equipment is in place.
  • Install and regularly check the functioning of essential safety devices like EPIRBs and SARTs, to ensure safety equipment is in place.
  • Equip the boat with a well-stocked first aid kit, including necessary medications, bandages, and disinfectants, to ensure safety equipment is in place.
  • Have a reliable communication system, such as a VHF radio or satellite phone, to stay in contact with other vessels and emergency services and to ensure safety equipment is in place.
  • Ensure the boat has proper fire extinguishers, smoke detectors, and carbon monoxide detectors, to ensure safety equipment is in place.
  • Install and regularly test the boat’s bilge pumps to handle water ingress and to ensure safety equipment is in place.
  • Keep all essential safety equipment easily accessible and in good working condition, to ensure safety equipment is in place.
  • Train the crew on how to use and deploy safety equipment properly, to ensure safety equipment is in place.
  • Regularly review and update the safety plan, considering the specific challenges and risks of the Atlantic crossing, to ensure safety equipment is in place.

By following these steps and ensuring safety equipment is in place, sailors can improve their preparedness and enhance the overall safety of the Atlantic crossing.

Some Facts About How Long To Cross The Atlantic By Sailboat:

  • ✅ An Atlantic crossing on a sailboat takes an average of 20 to 25 days.
  • ✅ It is important to know the shortcuts, maximize speed, and have experience to cross the Atlantic.
  • ✅ The best time to cross the Atlantic is between November and February.
  • ✅ The total distance of the trip can be as much as 4,000 nautical miles.
  • ✅ The trade winds blow from east to west and are predictable due to the rotation of the earth.

Frequently Asked Questions

How long does it take to cross the atlantic by sailboat.

An Atlantic crossing on a sailboat takes an average of 20 to 25 days, but can be completed in two weeks if lucky, take shortcuts, and have a fast sailboat. The time it takes to cross depends on the route, type of ship, size, skills, and speed.

What are the best routes for crossing the Atlantic by sailboat?

There are two main routes for crossing the Atlantic by sailboat: the Southern passage (east to west) and the Northern passage (west to east). The Southern passage starts from Europe and goes to the Canary Islands, Cape Verde, or the Windward Islands. The Northern passage starts from the Caribbean and goes to Bermuda, the Azores, and then the Portuguese coast.

When is the best time to cross the Atlantic by sailboat?

The best time to cross the Atlantic by sailboat is between late November and February, as there is less chance of hurricanes and the water is warmer. Timing is important to avoid the hurricane season, which lasts from June to November.

What are the challenges of crossing the Atlantic by sailboat?

Sailing across the Atlantic can be challenging mentally and physically. It requires sailing expertise, familiarity with weather forecasting and navigation, and the ability to quickly adjust to sudden changes in weather. The trip can also involve long travel, large waves, severe weather, collisions, encounters with whales, and epic proportions of wear and tear on the boat.

What type of sailboat is suitable for crossing the Atlantic?

The best sailboat for crossing the Atlantic should be at least 30 feet long, have a fixed keel, and be sturdy with durable sails. A monohull sailboat is recommended over a sailboat with multiple hulls. The type of boat used affects the speed of travel, and the location can also be a factor.

Can I hire a skipper for the Atlantic crossing if I lack experience?

Yes, hiring an experienced skipper is an option for those without the necessary skills and experience to safely make the journey. A skipper can provide guidance, navigation expertise, and help ensure a successful crossing.

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Crossing the Atlantic by Motor Yacht Routes

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht is a challenging but rewarding experience. There are a number of different routes that you can take, and the best route for you will depend on your experience, the type of boat you are sailing, and the time of year you plan to sail.

Here are some of the most popular routes for crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht:

  • The North Atlantic Route: This route is the most direct route across the Atlantic Ocean. It starts in Europe and ends in the Caribbean. The North Atlantic Route is generally the fastest route, but it can also be the most challenging. The weather conditions in the North Atlantic can be unpredictable, and there is a risk of encountering icebergs.
  • The South Atlantic Route: This route is less direct than the North Atlantic Route, but it is generally considered to be safer. The South Atlantic Route starts in Europe and ends in South America. The weather conditions in the South Atlantic are more stable, and there is no risk of encountering icebergs.
  • The Azores Route: This route is a good option for those who are looking for a more leisurely crossing. The Azores Route starts in Europe and ends in the Azores Islands. The Azores Islands are a group of volcanic islands in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. They offer a safe haven for yachts crossing the Atlantic, and they also offer a variety of amenities and attractions.

No matter which route you choose, it is important to do your research and plan carefully. You should also make sure that you have the proper safety equipment on board, and that you are familiar with the weather conditions and hazards that you may encounter.

Here are some additional tips for crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht:

  • Plan your route carefully. There are a number of different routes that you can take across the Atlantic Ocean. It is important to plan your route carefully and to choose a route that is appropriate for your experience and the time of year you plan to sail.
  • Check the weather forecast. It is important to check the weather forecast before you set sail. The weather conditions in the Atlantic Ocean can change quickly, so it is important to be aware of the potential hazards.
  • Have the proper safety equipment on board. It is important to have the proper safety equipment on board your yacht, including life jackets, flares, and a first-aid kit.
  • Be prepared for the worst. The Atlantic Ocean is a large and unpredictable body of water. It is important to be prepared for the worst, and to have a plan in place in case of an emergency.

By following these tips, you can help to ensure a safe and enjoyable crossing of the Atlantic Ocean.

There are many different ways to cross the Atlantic by motor yacht. Some people prefer to go straight across, while others choose to sail along one of the great circle routes. There are also a number of different options for stopping along the way, depending on your preferences and needs. Here we will explore some of the most popular routes for crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht.

Setting sail from the United States to Europe is an amazing adventure. While it’s possible to fly across the Atlantic, there’s something special about taking a leisurely journey by motor yacht. Here are some popular routes for crossing the Atlantic by yacht. The most popular route for crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht is from Newport, Rhode Island to Cowes, England. This route takes advantage of the prevailing winds and currents, making for a relatively easy journey. The trip can be done in as little as two weeks, but most people take four to six weeks to enjoy all that this amazing voyage has to offer. Another popular route is from Fort Lauderdale, Florida to Porto Santo in Portugal. This longer journey takes advantage of the Gulf Stream, which helps push yachts along at a good clip. Most people take three to four weeks to complete this voyage. No matter which route you choose, crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht is an incredible experience that you’ll never forget!

Crossing the Atlantic by Motor Yacht Routes

Credit: godownsize

What are Some Good Motor Yacht Routes for Crossing the Atlantic

There are many motor yacht routes for crossing the Atlantic, but some are better than others. The best route depends on the time of year, the weather conditions, and the boat’s speed and range. One good route is to start from Portugal or Spain and head west to the Canary Islands. From there, you can continue west to Cape Verde and then turn north towards the Lesser Antilles. This route takes advantage of the prevailing winds and currents in this part of the world. Another option is to start from Bermuda and head east towards Puerto Rico. This route is shorter, but it can be more difficult because of the strong trade winds that blow from east to west across this part of the ocean. Which route you choose will also depend on your destination. If you’re headed for Florida or the Gulf Coast of the United States, starting from Bermuda makes more sense. But if you’re headed for Europe or Africa, starting from Portugal or Spain is a better option. No matter which route you choose, crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht is an adventure that you’ll never forget!

What are Some Things to Consider When Planning a Motor Yacht Crossing of the Atlantic

When planning a motor yacht crossing of the Atlantic, there are a few things to consider. The first is the route. There are two main routes- one via the Canary Islands and one via Bermuda. The Canary Islands route is shorter, but has more potential for bad weather. The Bermuda route is longer, but generally has better weather. The second thing to consider is provisioning. A motor yacht uses a lot of fuel, so you will need to make sure you have enough onboard to get you across the Atlantic. You will also need to have enough food and water for everyone on board, as well as any emergency supplies that might be needed. Finally, you will need to consider the weather. This is especially important if you are taking the Canary Islands route. Check the forecast before you set sail and be prepared for any potential storms that could come your way. With some careful planning, a motor yacht crossing of the Atlantic can be a safe and enjoyable experience for everyone involved.

What are Some Hazards to Be Aware of When Crossing the Atlantic by Motor Yacht

When crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht, there are a few hazards to be aware of. First and foremost is the weather. The North Atlantic is notoriously stormy, and even in summer there can be strong winds and waves. It’s important to check the weather forecast before setting out, and to have a plan for what to do if conditions start to deteriorate while you’re at sea. Another hazard is pirates. While piracy is more commonly associated with the waters off Somalia and Indonesia, it does still happen in some parts of the world, including the Caribbean Sea and parts of South America. If you’re planning on sailing through any areas where piracy is known to occur, it’s important to take precautions such as hiring armed guards or sailing in convoy with other boats. Finally, there are also political risks to consider when crossing international waters. Tensions can flare up suddenly between countries, and if you find yourself in the wrong place at the wrong time you could end up getting caught in the middle of a diplomatic incident or even being detained by foreign authorities. Again, it pays to do your research before setting sail and to have a contingency plan for what to do if things go wrong.

What are Some Tips for Making a Successful Transatlantic Crossing by Motor Yacht

When making a transatlantic crossing by motor yacht, there are a few key things to keep in mind in order to have a successful trip. First, it is important to have a well-equipped and well-maintained vessel. This means having all the necessary safety equipment on board and making sure that everything is in good working order before setting out. Secondly, it is crucial to have an experienced crew who knows how to handle the boat and the conditions at sea. Thirdly, it is important to plan your route carefully, taking into account weather patterns and currents. Finally, be prepared for anything and always err on the side of caution when at sea.

Atlantic Crossing in a 2019 Motor Yacht Lagoon 630

There are many ways to cross the Atlantic by motor yacht, but there are three main routes that are most popular. The first route is from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean. This route is popular because it offers good weather and sailing conditions. The second route is from the Azores to Bermuda. This route is popular because it avoids bad weather and has good sailing conditions. The third route is from Newfoundland to the United Kingdom. This route is popular because it offers great scenery and wildlife watching opportunities.

Related: How Long to Cross the Atlantic by Motor Yacht

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can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

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can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

BoatingNarrative

Can A Yacht Make It Across The Atlantic? (Factors To Consider)

When it comes to crossing the Atlantic Ocean, there is no one-size-fits-all answer. The type of yacht you choose, the route you take, and the conditions you face will all affect how long it takes you to make the crossing.

In this blog, we’ll take a look at some of the factors you need to consider when making the decision to sail across the Atlantic.

Can A Yacht Make It Across The Atlantic

The First Question You Need to Ask Yourself Is What Type of Yacht Is Best Suited for an Atlantic Crossing?

There are a few different options, and the best one for you will depend on your experience and budget. If you’re a beginner sailor, you may want to consider a smaller boat that is easier to handle. If you’re an experienced sailor, you may want to go for a larger boat that can handle rough seas.

Once you’ve chosen the type of yacht, you need to consider the route you’ll take. The best way to cross the Atlantic is usually via the Cape Verde Islands or South America. These routes are shorter and more direct, which means that your sailing time will be shorter. However, these routes are also more challenging, so it’s important to choose one that you’re confident you can handle.

How Long Can You Sail a Yacht Across the Atlantic?

How Long Can You Sail a Yacht Across the Atlantic

This will be determined by a variety of things, including the size of your yacht, the route you take, and the weather conditions. Most yachts can make the crossing in about two weeks, but it’s important to be prepared for rough seas and possible delays.

Assuming twenty days at 12 knots per day, a yacht crossing the Atlantic can travel 2,880 nautical miles at an average speed of 14.5 knots (nautical miles/hour).

This number assumes no stormy conditions can slow down your voyage west across the Atlantic Ocean, however, if the sailing time is extended due to rough ocean waters or winds preventing you from reaching every mile at its fastest sailing rate.

How Much Fuel Do You Need to Make It Across the Atlantic?

How Much Fuel Do You Need to Make It Across the Atlantic

This will vary depending on the size of your yacht and the route you take. On average, you’ll need about 100 liters of fuel per day to make the crossing. Note: Fuel consumption at a speed of 15 knots will be increased during emergencies thanks to going at full throttle.

How Long Can Your Yacht Sail Without Refueling?

The average cruising yacht can sail for about three weeks without refueling. However, this can differ depending on the yacht’s size and engine type. The weather should also be taken into account. The Atlantic is a notoriously windy ocean and can be treacherous in the winter months. 

-Make sure you have a good weather forecast and are prepared for rough seas. 

-Make sure the sails are in good condition, the hull is clean and free of barnacles, and the engine is well-maintained.

-Finally, you need to make sure your yacht is in good condition.

How Do You Choose the Right Boat for Your Atlantic Crossing?

How Do You Choose the Right Boat for Your Atlantic Crossing

The trip can be made by several different types of vessels. The most popular are sailboats. Sailboats are the best choice for those looking for a more leisurely crossing. They can sail with the wind and don’t have to rely on engines to get them across.

This makes for a more enjoyable crossing, but it also means that the crossing can take longer. If you’re looking for a quicker crossing, you may want to consider a powerboat. Powerboats can make the crossing much faster, but they can also be more difficult to sail. 

Another factor to think about while selecting a boat is its size. For a crossing of this length, you’ll want a boat that’s at least 30 feet long. This will give you enough room to sleep, eat, and store your belongings. You’ll also want a boat that’s stable in bad weather. A boat that’s too small or too unstable could be dangerous in rough seas. 

Finally, you’ll want to think about the type of sailing you’ll be doing. If you are doing a lot of sailing, you’ll want a boat with a good autopilot. If you are mostly motoring, you’ll want a boat with a good engine.

How Many Sailors Do It?

The number of sailors who make the crossing every year varies, but it’s estimated that about 1,000 yachts make the crossing each year.

Across the Atlantic, there are many sailors that complete the voyage in a motor yacht. In order to make it across, the yacht must have enough fuel capacity, and the time of year must be right. The ocean can be a harsh place, so a sailing yacht is not always the best option.

How Do You Set Sail Across the Atlantic?

How Do You Set Sail Across the Atlantic

The process of setting sail for an Atlantic crossing can be daunting, but it’s not as difficult as it seems. The first step is to double-check that you have all of the necessary supplies, including food, water, fuel, and spare parts. Once you’re ready, you can set sail for the open ocean.

  • The weather can be a major factor in deciding whether or not to set sail
  • You’ll want to make sure you have enough fuel to make the trip
  • It’s important to make sure your yacht is in good condition and is properly equipped for the journey

How Big Does a Yacht Have to Be to Cross the Atlantic?

There is no one definitive answer to the question of how big a yacht must be to make a successful transatlantic crossing. The size of the yacht, its draft, the number of crew and passengers, and the weather conditions at the time of the crossing will all be factors in the success or failure of the voyage. 

That said, a yacht that is too small may not have the stability or range required to make the journey, particularly in rough weather. A yacht that is too large may be unwieldy and difficult to manage in tight quarters or in choppy seas. 

In general, a yacht that is at least 50 feet long with a draft of at least six feet will have the stability and range to make a successful crossing. However, experienced ocean sailors may choose a smaller or larger yacht depending on the conditions they expect to encounter. 

Many yachtsmen opt to cross the Atlantic in a catamaran, which is more stable and has a greater range than a monohull yacht. Catamarans also tend to be faster than monohulls, making them a desirable option for longer crossings.

How Far Can You Travel on a Yacht?

While most yachts can only travel about 500 miles per day, there are a few that can travel up to 1,000 miles per day. Yachts can also travel from the Mediterranean to the United States. The longest route for a yacht is the Great Circle Route. This is a route that goes around the world.

Yachts can travel up to 25 knots (29 miles per hour). This is the cruising speed for most yachts. The speed of a yacht depends on the wind and the waves. The wind can push a yacht in the direction that it is going. The waves can help a yacht move forward.

There are many things that a yacht captain needs to know before they set sail. They need to know the weather conditions, the winds, and the waves. They also need to know the route that they are taking.

Can a Yacht Survive Through Rough Seas?

Can a Yacht Survive Through Rough Seas

Yes, a yacht can survive through rough seas, but it’s important to choose the right boat and to be prepared for the worst. Ensure that you have enough food and water and fuel to make it through any type of weather.

 However, you need to be prepared for all kinds of conditions. Headwinds can slow down yachts, and the middle of the ocean can be a lonely place.

  • Yachts need to be well-equipped for the journey.
  • They need to have sturdy hulls that can withstand the impact of waves.
  • Make sure they have strong masts and rigging.
  • Yachts need to have a good supply of food and water.
  • They need to have charts and navigational tools.

What Are the Pros and Cons of Sailing Across the Atlantic?

The pros of sailing across the Atlantic include getting to enjoy the wide ocean and seeing some of the world’s most magnificent vistas.

It’s difficult to beat the difficulty and adventure of sailing such a great distance. The ocean is also a great place to get away from it all, and there is a sense of freedom that comes with sailing on the open seas.

There are also a few potential cons to consider. One is the fact that weather conditions can be unpredictable, and storms can pop up quickly. Navigation can also be difficult in open water, and there is always the possibility of running into trouble.

Another consideration is the distance itself. The 3,000-mile Atlantic passage from Europe to the Americas is arduous, and it might take weeks or even months to complete.

In the end, whether or not to sail across the Atlantic is a personal decision. Those who are drawn to the challenge and adventure of such a voyage will likely find it an unforgettable experience. However, it’s critical to be aware of the hazards and to be prepared for the worst.

How Many Yachts Make the Crossing Every Year?

The number of yachts that make the crossing every year varies, but it’s estimated that about 1,000 yachts make the crossing each year.

The journey typically starts in late summer, when the westerly winds are strongest. It’s a great experience to motor across the north Atlantic, and many boats have successfully completed the crossing.

  • The weather can be a major factor in deciding whether or not to set sail.
  • You’ll want to make sure you have enough fuel to make the trip.
  • It’s important to make sure your yacht is in good condition and is properly equipped for the journey.

How Long Does It Take to Make the Crossing?

On average, it takes about two weeks to make the crossing, but it can take longer if you encounter bad weather.

The journey can take longer if the yacht anchors in harbors, but this can also add to the cost of the trip. The bluewater sailing is a beautiful experience, but it is important to be aware of the weather conditions and to have sufficient supplies on board.

How Much Does It Cost to Make the Crossing?

The cost of making the crossing will vary depending on the type of yacht you choose and the route you take. However, on average, it costs about $5,000 to make the crossing.

Making a crossing from the US East Coast to Europe on a yacht can be a costly and time-consuming proposition. The main costs are fuel, food, and berthing. There are several ways to reduce the costs.

  • Using a solar panel to power the boat can reduce the need for fuel.
  • A bigger boat will also provide more space for provisions, and sailing on a freighter can avoid the need for berthing fees.
  • The main challenge is the distance.

What Are the Dangers of Sailing Across the Atlantic?

The dangers of sailing across the Atlantic are storms, rough seas, and pirates. It’s critical to be ready for the worst and have a strategy in place in the event of an emergency. Sailors must be aware of the risks of sailing in open water, and they need to be prepared for the challenges they may encounter.

One of the biggest dangers of sailing across the Atlantic is the weather. Sailors need to be prepared for all types of weather, from storms to high winds to hurricanes. They also need to be aware of the weather patterns in the area they are sailing in, and they need to be prepared for the possibility of encountering bad weather.

Another danger of sailing across the Atlantic is the ocean itself. The ocean is a huge and unpredictable area, and sailing through it can be dangerous. Sailors must be aware of the risks of sailing in open water, and they need to be prepared for the challenges they may encounter.

What Type of Yacht Is Best Suited To Make It Across The Atlantic?

The type of yacht that makes it across the Atlantic depends on where you want to go. If you’re going to Europe, you should consider buying a yacht that has been built specifically for ocean crossings. These yachts are designed to withstand rough conditions and make crossing the ocean easier.

  • Look at the size of the yacht before you buy it. Bigger yachts are safer and more stable than smaller ones.
  • Consider the length of the yacht. Longer yachts are safer than shorter ones.
  • Check if the yacht has an engine room. This is important because engines can fail during storms.
  • Look at what kind of sails the yacht has. Some yachts have sails that are made of canvas, while others use metal sails. Metal sails are stronger and last longer than canvas sails.

Luxury Viewer

Can Superyachts Cross The Atlantic?

Joshua Palmer

Superyachts are some of the most formidable private vessels on the ocean, but are they capable of crossing the Atlantic Ocean?

Superyachts can definitely cross the Atlantic – some with absolute ease. There are routes from the United States to Europe that stretch for just over three thousand miles, a distance which some superyachts can swallow up in no time. They’re also big enough to handle any adverse Atlantic weather.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Read on to learn more about superyachts and their dominance over the world’s oceans.

Set Sail On The Sea In Your Superyacht

If you’ve got tens of millions of dollars laying around doing absolutely nothing, why not invest in a superyacht? They’re perfect for exploring the world, especially if you want to do so in what is essentially a floating mansion. 

There are few things more lavish or extravagant than a superyacht. They’re regularly seen in the world’s most luxurious resorts and harbors around the world and are almost exclusively reserved for society’s elite.

At the highest end of the spectrum, superyachts come in sizes that rival some small hotels and boast price tags of hundreds of millions of dollars. They come equipped with state of the art technology, and they’re often made with the finest materials and sumptuous fittings. 

If you don’t want to buy one, you can lease them from numerous brokers that specialize in yacht rental. However, going down that route will still cost you around a quarter of a million dollars a week – at least.

Ultimately, superyachts are intensely unique, with each one differing dramatically from the next. They’re designed and built on a case-by-case basis, a process that often features architects, interior designers, and engineers. 

This is why some superyachts become incredibly prolific, with ‘fans’ actively trying to spot them when they’re out around the world’s oceans. For example, yacht hunting is a common activity in places like Monaco, Sardinia, Portofino, Saint-Tropez, and Abu Dhabi.

There’s little restriction surrounding the piloting of these superyachts, and they’re more or less open to travel wherever they so desire. Of course, this means they’ll sometimes have to contend with some of the world’s biggest oceans. 

In this article, we’re going to discuss superyachts crossing the Atlantic Ocean. However, if you’d like to find out whether superyachts can cross the gargantuan Pacific Ocean, you can do so here .

Advance Across The Atlantic

While the Atlantic Ocean might seem like a daunting thing to cross, it’s actually an extremely common thing to do. Every day, hundreds of vessels make the crossing, including cargo ships, passenger liners, and military vessels. 

This traffic also includes numerous superyachts, ferrying wealthy passengers and owners from Europe to the United States. Alternatively, they could be traveling from the Caribbean to Africa, or Canada to the United Kingdom. 

It’s ultimately up to the owner where the superyacht travels, and as long as they have enough fuel in the tank, the Atlantic doesn’t pose much of an obstacle. It is a long crossing, true, but they’ll be doing it in some of the most luxurious circumstances possible. 

It can take anything from ten days to three weeks to successfully navigate the Atlantic Ocean. If the conditions are fair and the ship’s course doesn’t have to be altered too much, the journey will be much faster. 

There are some superyachts that can make the crossing on a single tank of fuel, without breaking a sweat. At the higher end of the spectrum, this includes the Azzam , one of the largest yachts in the world with a value of almost half a billion dollars.

Azzam is powered by enormous and economical engines that produce a cruising speed of around eighteen knots. It’s such a huge superyacht that one hundred people can comfortably live aboard, all at the same time. 

Quite simply, it’s one of the most luxurious and opulent vessels in the world, with a drastic amount of amenities and technology. Before Azzam was launched in 2013, more than four thousand people were involved in her construction. 

This is just one of a few superyachts that can cross the Atlantic with ease. In fact, there’s a whole category of superyacht built to travel extremely long distances. 

They’re known as ‘explorer’ yachts, and they’re specially designed to travel in the more adverse conditions, and across the widest oceans. The best example is the Octopus , a 126-meter superyacht with a value of three hundred million dollars.

If you’re going to cross any super-wide ocean paths, there are few better ways to do it than in one of these vessels. 

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can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Can Yachts Cross The Pacific & Atlantic Oceans?

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Both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans can be crossed in a yacht.  You can cross the Pacific and Atlantic oceans on a sailing yacht or a motor yacht. It would be best to have a big enough tank to hold the amount of fuel you expect to burn.

This being said, not all yachts are capable of making these trips.  If you decide to cross either of these oceans, you’ll want to make sure you have an ocean-faring yacht as well as the equipment and skills needed to make the trip.

Some yachts will not hold enough fuel to complete the trip and will typically be shipped on freighters designed for this.

In this post, I’ll go over some of the important facts you should know about yachts before you decide to make your voyage:

Table of Contents

Category “A” Yachts Are Ideal For Open Oceans

Yachts are categorized into four main categories.

These categories range from A to D, and they determine what type of waters the yacht was built to navigate.

Category “D” Yachts

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

A category D yacht is only rated for inland or sheltered coastal waters.

You can use them on lakes and rivers and even protected harbors.

They’ll do well as long as the waves don’t reach heights of over 4 feet.

Category “C” Yachts

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

A category C yacht is rated to be used inshore.

This means that it can head away from the protected harbors, but it shouldn’t go very far.  Large bays and lakes can be navigated, and the boat can take on waves up to 8 feet high.

Category “B” Yachts

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

A category B yacht is designed to go offshore.

It can handle strong winds and waves of up to 13 feet.

While you probably wouldn’t want to do an ocean crossing in this vessel, it might be able to handle one of the weather stayed calm for an extended period of time.

One of the issues a category B would have is that it might not be built to be self-sustaining for the length of time needed to cross an ocean.

Also, it wouldn’t be able to hold up in the event of an extreme foul-weather event.

Category “A” Yachts

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

On the other hand, Category A boats are designed to sustain themselves for long voyages like a crossing of the world’s oceans.

They are made to withstand rough weather and storms so you won’t get lost in the middle of the Atlantic or Pacific.

They are longer than 40 feet and can take on waves of up to 23 feet.  These boats can also take on strong winds of at least 47 knots.

They have weather systems and advanced computers that help you calculate and master the long trip of crossing the biggest seas.

Who Determines How A Yacht Is Categorized?

The manufacturer or boat builder will initially determine which category the boat should fall under.

However, this shouldn’t be the only determining factor.

To ensure that the yacht is actually built correctly for trips over the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, it should be certified by the International Marine Certification Institute.

When you’re looking to buy a yacht, make sure it has been rated by this institute.  You can do this by looking for a certification plaque that will be mounted on the bulkhead.

Your Motor Yacht Should Be Able to Carry 1.5 Times The Amount of Fuel You’ll Need

Sailing yachts are often better suited for longer ocean crossings.  One of the main reasons for this is that they can sail themselves for an indefinite amount of time.

This being said, you don’t have to own a sailing yacht to cross the Atlantic or the Pacific.  A large motor yacht can potentially make the trip as well if it is designed for it.

How Much Fuel Is Needed To Cross The Atlantic & Pacific ocean?

For a medium-sized yacht, you should expect to have at least 500 gallons of fuel (2000 liters), unless you have sails.

If you are motoring in a big yacht, you will need more than that. You should bring 1.5 times the amount you expect to burn.

The motor yacht will need to be able to hold more than enough fuel for the trip, though.

This is because strong winds and currents can drastically increase the amount of fuel needed to complete a voyage.  For this reason, many veteran sailors say that you should bring about 1.5 times the amount of fuel you think you’ll actually need to complete the voyage.

Remember, running out of fuel in the middle of the ocean is a whole lot different than running out of fuel while cruising up the coastline.

You may not see anyone for days in the ocean, and even if you do, they probably won’t be able to tow you back to shore.

Remember the boating flag rules if you travel abroad .

How Long Time Does It Take To Cross The Atlantic & Pacific Seas?

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

It will take around 20 days or more to cross the Atlantic ocean and potentially much more if you are using your sails instead of the motor.

Depending on the weather conditions, it can take significantly longer to cross the Pacific ocean with a large yacht with a strong motor.

These are very general numbers.

They will vary a lot according to how much fuel you are willing to burn. The faster your motor, the more fuel you will burn. You can also cross the oceans with a yacht with sails.

This will save fuel but be slower because of the boat’s characteristics and since you are much more dependent on the weather conditions.

You May Need to Upgrade Some of Your Systems

It takes a significant amount of time to make an ocean crossing.

During this time, you’ll need to meet your food, water, and energy requirements.  You’ll also need to navigate the boat continuously.

Modern technology makes meeting these needs much easier.

In addition to having good navigation equipment, here are some systems you may want to consider upgrading to make life easier on the ocean.

  • Your water maker.
  • Your power generation systems.
  • Your freezer.
  • Your autopilot.

Water Makers

A watermaker will give you the ability to make your own potable water throughout your journey.

This cuts down on how much freshwater you need to pack and makes your yacht more self-sufficient.

This is important for a trip as long as crossing the Atlantic or Pacific sea.

Remember, your freshwater needs aren’t just restricted to drinking water.  You’ll need fresh water for bathing, cooking, and for washing your yacht off as well.  Most yachts will need daily cleanings as saltwater can quickly take its toll on a yacht’s decks and make the windows difficult to see through.

Power Generation Systems

A yacht can generate its own power using the sun, the wind, and the water.

They do this through the use of wind turbines, solar panels, and hydro-generators.

Wind turbines can create an impressive amount of energy in high winds.  However, most people will want to travel downwind, which reduces the amount of power that the wind turbine can generate.

Solar panels work great on sunny days while the panels are angled towards the sun.

The drawback is that they do not work nearly as well when they’re shaded, and every day is not a sunny day while out on the water or land for that matter.

Hydro-generators, on the other hand, can generate power 24 hours a day.  This is because the water’s movement powers them, and since you’ll be traveling day and night, you’ll always be generating energy.

The only drawback is that a hydro-generator does not produce a lot of energy at one time, and on sailboats, they will slow you down.

What Is The Best System to Use?

The best power generation system is a system that makes use of all of the technologies available.

Your energy requirements during an ocean crossing can be extremely high.  Not only this but yachts, in general, tend to need more power than other vessels.

Add a hydro-generator, a wind turbine, and some solar panels to your system, and you’ll have power day and night whether your crossing wide-open expanses or anchor at one of the islands along the way.  Larger sailing and power yachts also will typically have a diesel-powered generator or gen-set.

This one might be obvious, but you’ll need to pack a lot of food for your voyage.

Increasing the size and number of freezers you bring with you will increase the amount of meat and fruit you can bring.

Of course, you could skip this step and go with mostly dry foods instead.  But honestly, what yacht owner wants to subsist on a daily diet of rice and beans?

Autopilot Systems

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Your yacht will be moving at all times, and someone or something will need to be navigating it.

Autopilot systems make navigation easy and make an ocean crossing much less taxing.

Bring a backup autopilot system or spare parts for your existing system so that you can make any repairs necessary to keep it working throughout the entire trip.

Fail to do this, and you’ll find that the crew has to spend a lot more time navigating and a lot less time enjoying the journey.

Remember, it takes more than 20 days, at least, to cross the Atlantic ocean.

Your Crew Should Have Ocean Crossing Experience

It is possible to make an ocean crossing by yourself, but it isn’t recommended.

This is especially true if you’re making the crossing on a yacht.

The reason being, a yacht is going to be larger and more difficult to manage alone than a small sailing craft would be to manage alone.

For this reason, you’ll probably want to hire a crew or bring along plenty of friends or family members that can help you make the trip.  At least one person on the crew should have some experience making an ocean crossing.

This person’s knowledge could prove invaluable both before and during the long trip.  You and your other passengers should also have some experience with long passages so that you all know what to expect.

Trade Winds Will Dictate Your Voyage

You might think that you can easily shorten the time it takes to cross the Atlantic or Pacific oceans by making it a more direct one.

Unfortunately, this isn’t true, and your route will largely be dependent on trade winds.

What I mean by this is that you’ll end up traveling in a direction that follows the prevailing winds, so you are mostly traveling downwind.  This reduces the stress on your boat, makes the ride more enjoyable, and even makes it quicker.

Final Thoughts

Many people have crossed the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans in yachts and many other types of watercraft.

Some experience and adequate preparations are important for a safe adventure.

If you’re planning on making the trip on your yacht, make sure you have the right boat for the job, the right crew for the journey, and the right technology to make everything simple and easy.

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Oceanpreneur

What kind of boats cross the Atlantic Ocean? 7 Options explained

You’re looking for a way to go across the Atlantic without flying. What options are out there? Here are 7 options explained. I’ve tried five of them.

Sail across the Atlantic on a small vessel

Sailing an ocean on a Small sailing vessel

Many privately-owned sailing vessels cross the Atlantic, to spend a sunny sailing season either in the Mediterranean or Caribbean or as part of their around the world voyage. It is a big thing for them and attracts all sorts of seamen and women: young ‘pirate’ dudes who have escaped the rat race, adventure couples, retirees, families, groups of friends, and single older sailors.

The largest share of the captains is between 50 – 65 years old. It’s the group that has the time and money resources to sail. All sorts of nationalities make the crossing, with the French and Swedish seeming to dominate the fleet.

By crewing on a small sailing yacht, you’ll be involved with every aspect of seamanship and sailing. You will learn a lot for sure. Many boats choose to stop in Cape Verde or the Azores, and often don’t have tight schedules.

Sailing across the antlantic ocean

Boats come in all sorts of shapes and materials. Hulls are made from steel, wood, aluminium, and today mostly of fibreglass. 90% of the boats crossing the ocean is bigger than 36ft, with most of them measuring around 44ft. (14m).

A smaller yacht could also be perfectly ocean-worthy. I’ve seen boats of 26 ft. crossing the pond. Some adventure people row across the Atlantic. In 2017 someone even Stand Up Paddled (SUP) across the Atlantic. Being on any boat is a luxury compared to that.

Six people (out of 100) I interviewed in my book crossed the Atlantic on a boat smaller than 36ft. and all of them would like to do it again. This year we also have Nadiem, Ocean Nomads member who’ll sail across in his little sailboat.

Both monohulls and catamarans cross the Atlantic. Catamarans are generally faster, more spacious, and rock less. On the flip side: they can flip!  If  they do, it’s a major challenge to come up again. Don’t worry, this is extremely unlikely. Having seen hundreds of boats planning, preparing and making the crossing, I estimate that roughly 70% of the boats that cross are monohulls.

With Ocean Nomads we sometimes have small liveaboard sailing vessels looking for crew in the network to sail across, or members recommend a vessel from their networks.

Sail across the Atlantic on Superyacht

Many larger yachts cross the Atlantic as a ‘delivery’, where a boat needs to be taken from point A to B. Boats have to be moved across the ocean for a new charter season, for the private owner who will hop on board again on the other side, or because someone bought it on the other continent.

Usually, paid and professional crew do these types of deliveries. As an amateur crew member, you can be a cheap extra set of hands.

A yacht is a ‘superyacht’ when it is over 24 metres (79ft.). These are  big yachts. They often have generators running every day to keep fridges and freezers going. They load up thousands of litres of fuel and water, and are less dependent on the wind.

As such, there is less risk and generally more comfort. These trips often run on a tight schedule, so there won’t be much flexibility for stops along the way (like in Cape Verde or the Azores). In most cases, there will also be more people on board (five-eight people compared to three-five on smaller vessels).

Crossing on a big boat like this is faster, less adventurous, and more comfortable. The crew are often younger, and some live and work permanently on the boat. Many of them have crossed the Atlantic Ocean numerous times and are therefore less excited about it than the average ‘yachtie’.

Timelines are tight and there’s often not time for island exploration. Usually, you are expected to work hard. Also, it’s not unusual that superyachts don’t even use the sails to prevent damaging, and have the sails tip /top for when the owner comes on board.

A Transatlantic on a Charter yacht

If you would rather not have the pre-crossing adventure or spend too much time searching for a boat, and/or if money is not an issue, you can book a charter ocean passage. Charter trips are organised on all sorts of boats: small, big, monohulls, catamaran, and racing boats.

Numerous racing yachts cross the ocean reaching boat speeds up to 35 knots! In addition to professional crew, spots are sold and you can sign up for a wet and speedy adventure guaranteed.

A charter trip costs between €2,000 and €10,000. An organized trip like this could be advantageous if you’re on a tight schedule. It’s more likely to leave on the planned date.

At the same time, the time schedule could be a disadvantage. What if the weather window is not ideal to leave? In many cases, though not always, everything is taken care of such as provisioning and cooking, so you wouldn’t have to figure out much yourself.

Charter organisations need to comply with a lot of safety requirements and check ups to legally carry out the voyage. This assures some safety but still you need to do your homework if it’s a safe ride.

Another consideration of booking this type of passage is that you won’t know your shipmates. When you search the adventurous way, you have the opportunity to meet the other sailors before you commit to joining the crew. On a chartered passage you’re stuck with whoever else has booked the trip, even if you don’t like them.

With Ocean Nomads we work together with SV Twister and have the following Atlantic Crossing planned .

Sailing the Atlantic on a Tall ship

Every year numerous tall ships sail across the Atlantic, like the Stad Amsterdam or Oosterschelde, and this year also SV Twister :) .  Sailing across on a large traditional boat is spectacular. Many young people work on the tall ships. You could either try that or buy yourself a passage.

I wrote the above in my book, a friend of SV Twister reached out to me. Long story short, last  year 2022/2023 I, with Ocean Nomads, organizing a trip across the Atlantic, Caribbean sea, and back across the Atlantic , and I now experience this way of sailing across also. You can join this trip in 2025 .

Sailing the Atlantic on a Tall ship

Update! We’re back from the Atlantic. And we made a film about it:) Here is a the film about Sailing the Atlantic with Ocean Nomads. My 5th Atlantic crossing.

Travel the Ocean with a Sail Boat Ferry

There are no sailing ferries (yet), although boats are being built for this purpose. At the time of writing, Voyagevert is conducting feasibility studies to construct the fastest and largest sailing catamaran for a ferry service as a sustainable alternative to flight for transatlantic travel. Also Fair ferry is looking into it.

A transatlantic on a cruise ships

Another kind of ferry are the cruise ships. More and more cruise ships cross the Atlantic to do the season on the other side. They need relocation and spots on board are sold as ‘repositioning cruises.’ It’s often cheaper than airfare and your house rent combined. One option that is cool, is ‘ Nomadcruise ,’ an Atlantic crossing for entrepreneurs and digital nomads.

These floating cities are not an environmentally friendly way to cross. It takes around eight days and a lot of noise to cross with a cruise ship. Data on emissions is remarkably difficult to find. Some sources state that an average cruise ship at sea emits more, and less filtered, smoke than one million cars combined each day.

In a one week trip, a large cruise ship generates ten backyard swimming pools of blackwater (raw sewage), and 40 more swimming pools of greywater (water from sinks, baths, showers, laundry and galleys). They also generate large volumes of oily bilge water, sewage sludge, garbage and noise.

Sail Across the Atlantic on a Cargo ship

More cargo ships cross the Atlantic than sailboats. This is a non-sailing ship option that can take you across. Cargo ships usually rent out a few cabins to passengers. This costs a few thousand euros. Travelling with a cargo vessel can be a good alternative if you want to cross the ocean, don’t like sailing, and do not want to fly. Prepare to be surrounded by engine noise. Crossing on a cargo would take one to two weeks. Depending on the weather, cargo and size, cargo vessels run between 15-25 knots . 

There are also  sailing  cargo Atlantic crossing possibilities out there. ‘ Tres Hombres ‘ is a 32 metres Schooner transporting traditional goods like rum and chocolate between the Caribbean and Europe. Timbercoast is a 1920 built 43.5m Schooner that transports goods like coffee and gin. Both ships welcome crew on board helping out with this sustainable way of transporting goods.

My ocean sailing preference

“What kind of boat are you joining?” This was the first question most people asked me when I told them I was going to cross the Atlantic Ocean by sail. At the time, I knew nothing about boats, and thought “Does it matter? I just want to make the passage!” Having sailed across on five completely different boats across the Atlantic, I know now that the type of boat determines large part of the experience.Not just because of the boat, but because of the tasks and people involved with that type of boat.

My preference is to crew on a smaller monohull sailboat of 40-44ft – basic but adventurous and on these boats, I’ve met the coolest captains. Monohulls are more fun to sail. It’s easier to ‘feel’ the boat as opposed to a catamaran. It’s kind of like a scooter versus a quadbike.

Smaller boats generally allow for more exploring and socialising time around the harbour- since there’s usually less work to be done. This is the adventurous way of travelling by sailboat where you go with the weather and with others as excited about the adventure as you. I sailed as crew on these kind of sailboat for years ( Here is a video summary of my story ).

At the end, it’s the people who make the trip! In my survey amongst 100 Atlantic ocean Crew & Captains who have done it, almost everyone answered to the question: “what would you do different, if you’d go again?” “I’d take more time to find the right vessel, with like minded and value sharing people.

Finding a boat is the easy part, finding the right and safe vessel aligned with your vibes and values, is the main challenge. With Ocean Nomads we now created a toolkit to help you dip your toes into the ocean nomads lifestyle , happy, safe, and meaningful.

How to find a sail boat ride across the Atlantic?

Here’s what I, and ocean nomads, have created for you to help you get out there, happy, safe, and meaningful.

It’s that time of the year again where many head south and west to follow the sun, catch the tradewinds, and realize ocean dreams.

Travelling an ocean on someone else’s sailing boat, or taking a stranger on board is not a straightforward endeavour. To be ready to expect the unexpected, careful investigation and preparation is essential. Four Ocean Crossings and 30.000 Miles of boat hitchhiking on dozens of vessels, as well as organizing crew for +10 different trips now, I figured out a few things, and keep learning:).

Here are the latest waypoints to help you on an ocean adventure, fun & impact:

📝

  • We’ve created resources and mini-courses on Sailing across the Atlantic, Offshore crew packing lists, Ocean crew preparing tips. Provisioning with minimum waste, Veggie recipes, Zero waste nomad life, and ocean education information. But the real value is the network you can tap into, find answers, connections, and support to make the ocean adventure dreams real.

🌠

  • Because of that we can create way real value and attract real dedicated members only who are serious about making dreams real. 

NEW in 2024! The Sailboat Travel Crew Prep course.

All my sailing lifestyle crew tips condensed into one pack. 

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Ps. If any of the above has helped you, I’d love to hear so! Make a comment, leave a review on @oceanpreneur or @oceannomads.community, fill out the big Atlantic Ocean Crew survey

On which boat have you crossed or would you be most exciting to cross the Atlantic?

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

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can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

How To Cross the Atlantic, Routes and Timelines

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

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Before the time of ocean liners and airplanes, crossing the Atlantic used to be a great adventure that took a long time to complete. Nowadays, it’s very different; it’s still a great adventure, but the time it takes to complete has changed.

Here’s how long it takes to cross the Atlantic on various types of boats.

Looking at this table we can clearly see that the time it takes to cross the Atlantic has decreased exponentially. Some big developments were of course the steam engine that allowed for bigger and much faster ships to travel the Atlantic while also bringing a lot more cargo.

If we look at the Sailboats in this list, we can see that the more hulls you have the faster it goes (if you want to know more about how that works, check out this article)

There is not a significant difference in time to complete between the catamarans and the trimarans in the short run, but in a circumnavigation of the world, the difference can be huge.

A monohull on the other hand is slower, this is mainly due to the amount of drag this type of hull has.

This table compares different types of boats under the same conditions and adds an airplane as a point of reference.

Transatlantic Crossing in Record Time

Here are the records for the fastest crossings of the Atlantic in a Sailboat.

The 2880 Nautical miles(5330 Km) long route starts at Ambrose Light in New York and finishes on an imaginary line between Lizard Point and Ushant of the coast of England

As you might have noticed, there aren’t any numbers for catamarans since the  classes are divided between monohulls and multihulls.  Since trimarans (three hulls) are faster than catamarans (two hulls), there is no real point in racing a cat.

What you also may have noticed are the ridiculously high speeds these boats are doing. Bear in mind that these are racing boats optimized for speed and made to smash world records.

There’s a big difference between the 28 knots a racing trimaran will make and the 9 knots a cruising catamaran will.

What Type of Sailboat Do You Need To Cross The Atlantic?

Crossing the Atlantic can be done in almost any sailboat or ship. As a matter of fact, it has already been done in small rowboats and open catamarans, so everything is possible.

If your question is what boat should I use to get a somewhat comfortable and safe trip, well, then we have something to talk about.

Choosing between a monohull or a multihull has more to do with personal preferences. Some people really like the stable platform of a catamaran, and others dont think it’s a real way of sailing and wants to be heeling over to its side to fully get that true sailing experience.

For me? Catamaran every day, speed, and comfort, but I’m also not a purist sailor in any way. I’m an adventurist, and the boat is merely a way to experience adventures.

The size I would say matters, bigger usually means it’s safer and can handle bigger waves, although it might be harder to handle on your own I something happens to you or your crew mid-sea.

Most people seem to cross the Atlantic with a boat in the 35 -45 ft spectrum, which fulfills both requirements!

If you are interested in digging deeper into what sized boat you should get, check out my article on Best Sized Catamaran for Ocean Sailin g

Other aspects you might consider are the  size in terms of space onboard , how many people are you doing the passage with, the more people, the easier operating the boat will be. This assumes you have a well-trained crew that you know well.

And what are you going to do once you get there, is it the end of your trip or is the beginning. If you’re doing everything just to cross the ocean and then get someone else to bring it back, that’s one thing. But if its the start of a long adventure, the requirements are different. You are going to want more space for scuba gear, and other toys.

I do think the most important aspect is that you have a seaworthy boat that it’s capable of withstanding weeks on end with sailing in many times rough conditions.

This means that your equipment spent has to be the most expensive and handy, but it needs to be in good condition, and you need to be able to handle your great in every weather.

What Gear Do You Need to Cross the Atlantic?

Not including your average stuff when sailing, such as life vests, etc. There are some great that you might not be on your everyday say m still that could be of high importance during such a formidable sail as this.

  • Emergency food
  • Satellite coms
  • Storm drogue (want to know what it is and how it works,  read  this)
  • Spare parts(tiller, sails, etc.)
  • Entertainment

Different Routes to Cross the Atlantic

Westward route: europe to the caribbean.

According to Jimmy Cornell, a well-known sailor and circumnavigator that has made his own research on the subject, Las Palmas is one of the biggest ports of departure for sailboats crossing the Atlantic.

Around 75’% of the sailboats that arrive in Las Palmas on the Canary Islands will depart for an Ocean crossing.

Getting to The Canary Islands, you should not be in a hurry; there are many very beautiful places en route. No matter where you are coming from this is a good stop well worth a visit.

Coming from the north of Europe, you have France, Spain, and Portugal. Entering from the Mediterranean, you have Italy, Croatia, Greece, and so many other interesting places that you shouldn’t miss unless you’re on a very tight schedule.

Once you reach Las Palmas, you can either go straight towards the Caribbean island of Barbados, or you can do a stop along the way at Cap Verde.

Planing a Stop on Cape Verde

A stop at cap Verde makes sense in many ways; for one, it makes the transatlantic trip more manageable by dividing it into two sections.

The second reason is that it gives you the possibility to stock up on fuel and water that you might have used more than you thought. Since Cap Verde is well developed when it comes to receiving boats doing this type of passage, there is no technical expertise on the island.

From Cap Verde, you can also take a direct flight to Portugal and onwards if the need arises.

Even though you might not plan to stop here, the recommendation is to at least  plan your sailing, so you pass close to the islands,  so if something happens, you can head to Mindelo port and fix it.

Another good reason why you would go close is that the further south you go, the  better chance you will have of catching those sweet tradewinds  that will take you safely and enjoyably to the warm waters of the Caribbean.

Westbound Route On a Catamaran

Sailing west is the preferred option for any sailor and especially if you are on a boat that doesn’t sail perfectly upwind, such as a catamaran.

Sailin g west and using the tradewinds is perfect on a catamaran, the sail will be faster and more comfortable than a monohull of the same size.

Looking at the 2019 ARC (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers), a 55ft french catamaran outclassed the 65 ft professionally sailed monohull with a 10-hour lead. All this while doing yoga on board, something that I can promise was not happening on the monohull.

The stable platform of a catamaran with the wind on your stern makes sailing west on a transatlantic passage perfect for Catamaran.

Eastbound Route: The Caribbean to Europe

Coming back to Europe, I would argue that the same principles are still valid: to stop at or pass by islands close enough to have the option of going into port if need, and using the tradewinds to your advantage.

Considering this, most people leave the Caribbean from Tortola, Britsh virgin islands, or St Marteen. These make great starting points for the eastward journey since they are the last point where there is plenty of fuel, spare parts, and food for the long and sometimes arduous trip back to Europe.

Though it is not necessary, many sailors make a halt at Bermuda; this is a good start to fix anything broken or wait for the right weather before your head on to the next part of your trip.

The Azores, the same goes here, you can skip it, but staying close to it adds safety and comfort if needed, and I would also stop by just to enjoy the islands. It’s a beautiful place and good for a few days of low-intensity cruising.

If you still have some energy left after the trip from Bermuda, one option is to head for a place called Horta. The place is well remembered for its hospitality towards sailors heading towards Europe.

Once you have refueled on diesel and energy, it is time to head for northern Europe. This is usually done by sailing north until the 45th latitude and then heading east.

When is The Best Time to Cross The Atlantic

Choosing a route has a lot to do with your intended purpose of the trip, are you going for a speed record, then going more north might be an option, and accepting the risk might be ok for you and your crew.

If you are going west but more interested in doing it safely and are able to spend a little more time out at sea, then the southern routes mentioned above with a departure date around November and December.

Going west on your way to the Caribbean, you’ll notice the days are getting warmer and longer; this is because going west, you also travel south towards the equator where the days and nights are equally as long be it summer or winter.

This weather window is to avoid the hurricane season in the Caribbean that ends in late November, these are the main risk and must be considered in your plan.

What Is The Best Route For an Atlantic Crossing

Taking into consideration the information above with trade winds, the possibility of breakdowns, and the collective knowledge of the area.

The best route for a westbound Atlantic crossing is from Las Palmas (on the Island of Gran Canarias) to Barbados Via Cap Verde. The best route going east is from St Marteen to the Azores Via Bermuda.

This is, of course, based on the assumptions we have discussed above, and it might not apply to your skillset or aim of the crossing.

Can You Cross the Atlantic Single Handed?

You can definitely cross the Atlantic on your own (short-handed). As a matter of fact, many do every year. Of course, this demands more of the sailor since there is nobody to ask for advice or to help while underway.

Neither is there anyone that will help you with handling sails or maintenance while underway; because of this, it is more dangerous and more difficult to solo sailor sail short-handed as it is also called.

The usual way is to either bring a crew of your own, recruit a crew from the port of exit, or find one online via crewseeker.net.

Is Transatlantic Passages Dangerous?

Sailing in big oceans is never a hundred percent safe. This is why it is an adventure if it was absolutely safe, where would the attractiveness and the excitement lie?

Looking at the data, there aren’t many accidents happening, and of those, there are even fewer that are deadly or leave the crew injured for life.

There are also ways to make it safer; we have discussed boat size and crew skills; other route selection factors are vital. It might not be the quickest to cross the Atlantic, but the southern route seems to be a safer bet.

Prepare yourself, your crew, and the boat, and the chances for accidents will still be there, but they will be small and manageable.

How Lonely Is Crossing The Atlantic?

Spending two to three weeks in the middle of the ocean can definitely be lonely, but it can also be the absolute opposite. If you’re sailing with a crew, you will share the same small space with everyone else, always bumping your elbow. If the weather is rough, you may all be a little tired, which also adds to the group dynamics.

But even if you would get sick and tired of your crew, there are ways to call back home. You might have a Satellite phone, which is expensive by the minute but a lovely way to hear the voice of a loved one back at land. Much better than a text message through Email.

Sending emails has been a pretty straightforward process since the SSB radio started to be utilized.  This type of radio is very simplistic and has good reception up to thousands of miles .

The nice thing with this radio is that it allows for data traffic, which means not only are you able to receive weather updates, but you can also contact your family through Email.

Can You Get Rescued If Something Goes Wrong?

Yes, there might not be a coast guard or anything nearby, and you might be way out to sea, but there is help to get. Since every ship is listening to some set of frequencies, usually, the first step is to call for a Mayday on that channel.

If you’re not getting anyone’s attention, then they might still see you on the AIS, Automatic Identification System, which makes anyone around you know where you are.

Many times the crossing is done together with a lot of other vessels; this gives comfort as they might also be able to help in case of emergency.

If all this fails, you probably also will have your EPIRB,  Emergency  Position Indicating Radio  Beacon , which is a gadget that can be activated through certain triggers such as water, tilt angle, or manually activated.

Once activated, it sends an emergency signal at different frequencies and relays the information back to shore for someone to come help you.

Owner of CatamaranFreedom.com. A minimalist that has lived in a caravan in Sweden, 35ft Monohull in the Bahamas, and right now in his self-built Van. He just started the next adventure, to circumnavigate the world on a Catamaran!

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can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

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Entertainment, miscellaneous, classified ads, what boat do you need for an ocean crossing.

The crossing of an ocean in your sailboat is no easy task; you will need a sturdy and dependable vessel, a good deal of sailing experience, and strong hands-on abilities to be able to repair anything that could go wrong while you are at sea.

It is essential to have the sea boat that is optimal for ocean crossing in terms of size to navigate such a vast distance and remain functionally independent for weeks at a time.

But how large of a boat do you need to cross the ocean? Keep reading the post to find out more information.

What Size Boat For Ocean Crossing?

If you want a quick answer, the Atlantic Rally For Cruisers (ARC), run by the World Cruising Club every year in November from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean, requires a minimum sailboat length of 27 feet for ocean crossing to enter the competition. But most sailboats that cross the ocean are bigger than this.

Keep in mind that it's easier and cheaper to maintain a smaller boat, so you'll be more likely to keep it in good shape. The less likely you are to have problems during the trip, the better your boat is kept. How fast you go and how comfortable you are on board will depend on your boat size.

What Size Boat For Ocean Crossing

Longer water lines typically translate to higher top speeds.

It's safe to assume that, all else being equal, a larger boat will travel at a faster clip than a smaller one, even though there is some variation in speed between boats of the same length due to differences in shape and weight. Remember that the time it will take you to finish your crossing is also impacted by your chosen sailing technique.

For instance, when we sailed across the Atlantic Ocean from east to west in a monohull sailboat measuring 37 feet in length with a keel (a Tayana 37), it took us the same number of days as it did for a Bavaria 46 to complete the journey.

This is because we went further north than they did, where the wind was greater, and we ventured to sail "deeper" downwind than they did, which resulted in our covering fewer miles in the same amount of time as they did even though the wind was stronger.

The larger the boat, the more pleasant the journey will be for its passengers. You could claim that having greater space results in increased levels of comfort as a general rule. This is because larger boats often have more space for lounging, allowing more crew members to be carried on board and traveling more slowly overall.

Given this information, you will want to make the crossing in a boat at least 30 feet long and possibly even longer, depending on how many people you plan to have on board.

However, although a larger boat provides more space, the vessel's design also affects how easily the boat goes through the water, which decides how comfortable the passengers will be on board. For instance, we went with a keel sailboat 37 feet long, had a canoe stern, and was constructed with great care.

The heavy weight and deep keel of the Tayana 37 help keep the boat steady, and the canoe-shaped stern allows for waves following the boat to break naturally, as opposed to hitting a sugar scoop stern, which would cause a large splash and throw the boat off course. These characteristics combine to make the Tayana 37 a sailboat that moves more gently.

Is it possible for yachts to sail between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans?

A yacht is suitable for sailing across the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Sailing or motor yacht can travel between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. It is in your best interest to have a fuel tank that is spacious enough to carry the amount of fuel you anticipate using.

That said, not all yachts can do these kinds of journeys. If you choose to travel across either of these seas, you will want to ensure that you have access to an ocean-worthy boat and the necessary gear and expertise to complete the journey.

Because the fuel capacity of some yachts is insufficient for the journey, those yachts often have to be transported aboard specially adapted freighters.

How Long Does It Take To Cross The Atlantic & Pacific ocean?

It will take you at least 20 days to cross the Atlantic Ocean, and it could take longer if you choose to sail across the ocean rather than use a motor.

It is possible that crossing the Pacific Ocean on a large boat with a powerful motor will take a much longer amount of time, depending on the weather conditions. The amount of fuel you are willing to use significantly impacts how much variation there will be. When you increase the speed of your motor, you will need more fuel. Another option is you can also travel across oceans in a sailboat.

You will consume less gasoline doing this, but your speed will be slower due to the boat's features and the fact that the weather will greatly impact your journey.

What’s the smallest boat you can cross an ocean with? Does boat size matter?

The two most important concerns that typically come to the minds of ambitious sailors considering sailing across the Atlantic or the Pacific Ocean are the following: what is the smallest vessel capable of completing the journey? And does the size of the boat make a difference?

To address your question in a nutshell: yes, boat size does matter for various reasons. On the other hand, there are numerous examples of extremely small boats completing an ocean journey, indicating that other factors are more significant. Let's look at the kind of vessels that can successfully cross an ocean and why.

How Big Of A Boat Do You Need To Cross The Ocean?

If you want to cross the Atlantic Ocean, you will need a boat at least 30 feet long, regardless of whether you plan to sail or motor. For both protection and convenience, the ideal length of your boat is forty feet. Both motoring and sailing across the Atlantic are very different adventures, but to be one of them, you need a boat at least this size. You may also need an even larger boat if you plan to bring other people with you on the voyage.

Why Do You Need A Boat Of 30 Or 40 Ft To Cross The Ocean?

Since it is feasible to sail across the Atlantic Ocean in a much smaller vessel, the question arises as to why you would need a boat that is 30 or 40 feet in length. The answer is that attempting to cross in anything smaller can be very dangerous and becomes increasingly inconvenient as time goes on. This is a simple explanation. A boat of at least this size is desirable for several reasons, including the following:

Seaworthiness

When the waves start to get rough, the last thing you want to do is be confined in a little boat. In the Atlantic Ocean, storms frequently cause the sinking of boats with lengths significantly more than 30 or 40 feet. If it is any smaller than this, there is a significant possibility of sinking during a storm. Do not fall into the trap of believing that you can organize your trip so that it avoids the possibility of poor weather.

Storage of Supplies

You will need to bring supplies across the Atlantic Water, even if you plan to conduct as much open-ocean fishing as you possibly can while traveling across the ocean. You are responsible for packing an adequate supply of food and water for everyone in your crew to last them for the duration of the journey.

Keep in mind that border crossings typically take longer than anticipated, so stocking up on sufficient supplies is essential to account for delays. You will need to conserve fuel if you plan to make the voyage in a motorboat or if your sailboat is equipped with an auxiliary motor in case your primary one breaks down. If you need to bring many goods on your journey, you will probably require a larger boat. Too much weight on a boat might cause it to sit lower in the water, which can make it much less seaworthy, even if the boat would be seaworthy otherwise. When a boat is positioned too low in the water, it increases the likelihood that waves will swamp it.

Before you load up your boat and head out on the water, you must be sure that you are aware of the maximum amount of weight it can safely carry.

The Pleasure of the Staff

Before you've spent a few weeks aboard a vessel of either 30 or 40 feet in length, you might think that it's a rather big boat. If you want the passage to be enjoyable for everyone on board, you need a large enough boat to have its place on the boat and get up and stretch its legs at regular intervals while you are traveling. Even if only one or two people are working toward this objective, a staff of thirty or forty feet is required.

Crossing The Ocean In A Motorboat

It is possible that you will be surprised by the amount of fuel that is required to travel across the Atlantic Ocean in a powerboat. Merely storing all that fuel will use a considerable portion of your boat's available space.

In most cases, fuel should not be utilized for more than ninety days after it has been purchased. Although it should be long enough for you to traverse the Atlantic Ocean, there is a possibility that it is not. If you use a fuel stabilizer or avoid mixing it before, you can store the fuel for a longer period, up to six months or even two years. It is necessary to allocate a sizeable portion of your total storage space for fuel storage. This indicates that you may require a larger motorboat than a sailboat to complete the same journey.

When you travel across in a motorboat, rather than relying on the power of the wind to propel you, you use fuel to power your propulsion, which makes the trip a lot more predictable. However, this comes at the expense of increased storage space and fuel consumption. If you want to progress in a sailboat, you will need to wait until the wind blows in the right direction. On the other hand, a motorboat can travel in almost any condition except extremely stormy and bad weather. As a result, you won't need nearly as many goods to prepare for the possibility that you won't arrive at your destination when you anticipate that you will.

Crossing The Ocean In A Sailboat

The concept of traveling across the Atlantic Ocean by sailboat is one of the most romantic things a person can imagine doing. There is no one else to help you cross the ocean besides the winds from the Atlantic, you and your boat.

However, a high degree of danger is associated with sailing across the Atlantic. The wind must be strong enough to push you along to get you across the lake. If there is no wind, you may end up being adrift in the middle of the ocean for a considerably longer period than you had planned. It is advisable to fit your sailboat with at least a couple of engines if you are not completely committed to traveling only using sailing. Different motors will indeed add weight, which is not what you want. Still, most sailors believe that the added peace of mind from knowing they can motor when needed is well worth the burden of carrying that additional weight.

Bottom Line

It is difficult to think of an activity that would be more exciting than sailing alone across the Atlantic Ocean in your boat. It doesn't matter if you want to go with a monohull or a multihull, a powerboat or a sailboat; as long as you select a vessel that is at least 30 or 40 feet long and makes proper preparations, you should have a voyage that is filled with a lot of fun.

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  • May 28, 2019

Max Campbell explains how his dream of sailing solo across the Atlantic almost became a nightmare

solo-atlantic-crossing-max-campbell-flying-cloud-transatlantic

Flying Cloud is hardly the ideal yacht for sailing across the Atlantic

Having graduated from university, we had no commitments to work or education, and the freedom was overwhelming. And what better way to travel than a small sailing boat? We were transients, able to make a home wherever we dropped anchor – ever sure of a warm bed and a hot meal.

Our arrival in France was a novel occurrence, for both us and the people we met. With every stop, people were taken aback at the sight of two Cornish boys in a tiny wooden boat.

solo-atlantic-crossing-max-campbell-flying-cloud-northern-spain

Max and Harry aboard Flying Cloud in northern Spain

We headed south down the Atlantic coast and by September, we were cruising west along the rugged, green and foggy northern coast of Spain. We were welcomed in the smallest fishing harbours, our long mooring lines fixed to the tall granite harbour walls. The friendly harbour authorities would come by and ask for nothing more than our names, then invite us to make use of the facilities and stop for a drink at the local Club Nautico.

In Portugal, the lush scenery was replaced with a flat, arid landscape. Brightly painted houses lay behind rocky cliffs and long sandy beaches. We poled out the jib and embraced the Portuguese tradewinds, goose-winging our way to Lisbon. Here we made friends not with the locals, but with a motley group of single-handed yachtsmen, who were all, like us, bound for the Caribbean for the winter. We were living the same dream – and we were doing it on a shoestring.

Then Harry jumped ship and joined up with a girl who had a van. In Lisbon he moved his possessions from Flying Cloud ’s modest saloon into his new lover’s comparatively spacious 1997 Vauxhall Arena. It was an emotional goodbye, and initially I felt lonely and slightly dispirited at the thought of no longer having my best friend around to share conversation and boost morale. Also, on a practical level, it meant I would be unable to leave the helm when underway. So Harry was replaced with a bungee attached to the tiller – the ultimate short-term self-steering system.

Article continues below…

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

‘Did you sail that thing here?’ – solo across the Atlantic in a Folkboat

It’s a funny thing, the further I sailed away from northern Europe, the more attention my boat attracted in marinas…

solo-sailing-across-the-atlantic-calm-sailing-credit-max-campbell

Unfinished business: Sailing back across the Atlantic in a 22ft sloop

This is part two of Max Campbell’s account of sailing solo across the Atlantic – make sure to read part…

My inspiration to continue sailing came from Flying Cloud ’s library, which contained an array of works by influential adventurers: Chris Bonington, Tristan Jones, John Guzzwell, Shane Acton, Yossi Ghinsberg, Laurie Lee, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston and Bernard Moitessier. Dreams of adventure occupied my thoughts; I yearned for adventures of my own.

The imperfect vessel

Flying Cloud is a strong and capable little yacht. Her decks had been sheathed in epoxy, and she had a relatively modern aluminium rig and single cylinder Yanmar engine. But there were still three very important additions I needed to make before sailing across the Atlantic : self-steering; a sprayhood; and drainage in the cockpit.

I had always believed modern sprayhoods looked tacky on classic yachts and for a long time I rejected the idea of getting one. But every time solid water cascaded over the cabin top, which happened quite a lot, a hose-like stream shot down from under the sliding hatch and soaked the inside of the cabin. Keith Buchanan from Rat Island Sailboat Company, based on the Isles of Scilly, put together a canvas sprayhood, which fitted nicely over my sliding hatch.

solo-atlantic-crossing-max-campbell-self-steering-system

Plans for the self-steering system aboard Flying Cloud were drawn up by Max and his stepfather, Dave Cockwell, a master shipwright, in Portugal

I also covered the cockpit footwell with plywood and made two drain holes through the transom. It wasn’t totally self-draining, but it was a lot better than before.

Lastly, my stepfather, Dave Cockwell, who happens to be a master shipwright, and I created a series of drawings for a bespoke self-steering system. It was loosely based the design by Blondie Hasler, the man who founded the OSTAR in 1960, where the wind vane turns the trim tab, and the flow of water past the tab causes it to swing in the opposite direction, altering the course of the yacht.

Apart from the wooden vane and nylon bearings, everything was made from stainless steel. There were no wires or lines and no possibility of wear.

solo-atlantic-crossing-max-campbell-self-steering-system-tall

The wind vane self-steering and linkage

I sailed round to the Rio Guadiana, the turbid, meandering river that separates the south of Portugal from Spain, and finally finished building the self-steering moored among the community of British expats in between the Spanish village of San Lucar and the Portuguese village of Alcoutim.

I was making plans to leave, when a big low moved over the Algarve bringing three days of torrential rain. The water level quickly rose in the river and the current doubled in strength. One night, a southerly gale blew up in opposition to the river current and Flying Cloud swung around on her anchor chain like a wrecking ball. A big, saturated log, which must have rolled downstream along the river bed, managed to wrap itself three times around my anchor chain.

After a long struggle to free the boat, I motored back down river, weaving my way between extensive bamboo rafts, garden sheds, and bits of homemade pontoon, finally ghosting out from behind the breakwater and back into the comparatively clean and clear sea water of the Algarve.

In a westerly Force 3, I headed south-west and tried the self-steering, watching anxiously as my contraption took command. As Flying Cloud began to head up, the wind vane detected the change in direction and pushed on the trim-tab tiller, which shifted to starboard bringing her back on course. I was ready for the Atlantic.

  • 1. The imperfect vessel
  • 2. To the Atlantic islands

This $12 million yacht looks like a spaceship and can cross the Atlantic twice on a single tank — see inside 'Adastra'

  • A sleek, lavish megayacht fit for a Bond villain, called "Adastra," has hit the market for $12 million.  
  • Thanks to its efficient shape and lightweight construction, the yacht can cross the Atlantic twice without refueling and boasts a total range of around 11,500 miles. 
  • Adastra has a master bedroom, two guest cabins, and room for six crew members. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories .

Insider Today

Some people can't simply settle for a regular, run-of-the-mill superyacht like all the other millionaires and billionaires — they need something a bit flashier to set them apart from the crowd. 

For those people, there are yachts like Adastra , a sleek, custom-built trimaran that's currently on the market for a cool $12 million. 

The extravagant vessel — which looks less like a yacht and more like something out of "Star Wars" — is built for exploration, according to Burgess Yachts , which has the boat listed for sale. Due to its streamlined shape and lightweight construction, Adastra can travel across the Atlantic twice over without needing to refuel. Plus, Adastra's unique design means it can venture into shallow harbors and get up close to islands, unlike most traditional yachts.

But this multimillion-dollar yacht is built for pleasure, too — it sports multiple sunbathing areas, a diving platform, a lavish main room, three cabins for guests, and space for six crew members. 

See inside Adastra:

Adastra, a spaceship-like megayacht fit for a Bond villain, has hit the market for $12 million.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Commissioned in 2012 by shipping tycoon Anto Marden at a cost of at least $20 million, according to Robb Report, the trimaran yacht was built to cover vast distances and cross oceans.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Source: Robb Report

Thanks to its efficient shape, lightweight construction, and 15,000-liter fuel capacity, Adastra boasts a range of 10,000 nautical miles, or roughly 11,500 miles.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

That means the 140-foot ship can cross the Atlantic twice over without having to refuel, and its owner has done just that, he told Robb Report.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Plus, the yacht sits less than four feet below the water line, so it can venture into shallow harbors where traditional yachts can't.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

After spending several years cruising the globe aboard Adastra, Marden is ready to sell the head-turning vessel and give more attention to his other yacht, he told Robb Report.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

To keep passengers comfortable on long journeys, Adastra is every bit as luxurious as it is capable.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Inside, there's a main living space with a wraparound lounge area ...

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

... and panoramic windows.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

The yacht features lots of custom materials — including lightweight oak cabinetry — to decrease weight and improve fuel efficiency.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Behind the lounge, there's a full dining area ...

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

... complete with a kidney-shaped wood table and a pair of skylights.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Toward the back of the interior, there's a sofa and a bar area.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Below deck, there's a master suite that spans the full width of the hull.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

The master bedroom has a private full bath and desk.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

In total, Adastra sleeps up to nine guests ...

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

... along with six crew members.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

There's a second full bathroom below deck as well.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

The helm station has seating for two, and is raised up above the rest of the yacht.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

On the aft deck, there's teak flooring and a couple of lounge areas ...

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

... including a full dining setup for meals outside.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

The back of Adastra sports a large diving platform and has room for two "tenders," smaller boats for recreation and for getting to and from port.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

A sliding door at the front of the main saloon gives way to a covered lounging area on the bow.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Plus, there's a tanning area with bean bags for catching some rays. If all that sounds appealing and you've got a spare eight figures sitting around, this may be the yacht for you.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

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Can Superyachts Cross the Ocean?

Superyachts are one of the most opulent and extravagant things that anyone in the world can ever hope to own. With the high price tag also comes the ability to navigate the world’s oceans and explore the big blue yonder at your leisure in a vessel that is not just comfortable but is also equipped with the latest in modern technology and some serious horsepower.

Though superyachts are mainly designed for pleasure, they also have the ability to cross oceans. From Hong Kong to Seattle and Melbourne to Tokyo, most superyachts can sail the seas with relative ease. This is attributed to the strength of the engines and the capability of the vessel to handle potentially rough sea conditions.

Sanlorenzo Superyacht

How long does it take for superyachts to cross the ocean?

Depending on the size and the speed of the superyacht in question, crossing the Pacific can be done in as little as 7 days though most people prefer to take their time and enjoy the journey a little more. Most experienced sailors prefer to follow the curve of the Earth when navigating long distances to ensure that they are never far from land if something should go wrong. Plus, there is a greater risk of rougher seas if your superyacht is exposed to open waters, thousands of miles from the nearest shore.

Most superyachts run at speeds that vary from 30 knots to a top speed of 70 knots so the time it will take to cross the ocean of your choice will depend on the speed of your vessel. When planning a journey, you need to consider the speed of your vessel when allocating the time you are going to take to make it from point to point ensuring that you allow enough downtime to relax and enjoy the journey.

There are thousands of superyachts that are designed to cross the world’s oceans from gold-plated billion-dollar vessels to your run-of-the-mill, million-dollar superyachts. These yachts are all designed with the power to make the world’s greatest maritime journeys while keeping the occupants of the vessel in a modicum of style and comfort.

Can superyachts cross the Pacific Ocean?

If you have the right boat for the job, then you can most certainly cross the Pacific in a superyacht. Crossing the Pacific Ocean requires time and planning as well as a crew that has experience in ocean crossings to ensure that the safest possible trip is conducted. The Pacific Ocean is the largest and deepest ocean on Earth so it is no small undertaking, but it can be done.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Can superyachts cross the Atlantic Ocean?

The Atlantic Ocean has long been a favourite destination for superyacht owners. The close proximity to any number of European countries makes for an interesting journey where stops can be made along the way to refuel, stock up on supplies and explore on land as well as at sea. Superyachts are designed to hold large amounts of fuel and supplies, but the stops you can make when you cross the Atlantic Ocean also make for a more eventful journey if you don’t particularly want to spend weeks on end at sea.

What supplies are required for a journey across the ocean?

If you are planning on crossing the ocean on a big journey, there are many supplies that you will need to sustain your crew and passengers for the weeks you will be spending at sea. Superyachts will typically have staff and crew to take care of a lot of the planning, but there are certain supplies that many could not live without.

Fuel: Crossing an ocean is no small feat, no matter what size vessel you are taking. Carrying adequate amounts of fuel to make the journey is one of the most important supplies you will need to ensure that you can get to where you’re going without delay or problems arising. Seasoned sailors will always recommend that you carry at least 1.5 times more fuel than you’re calculated requirements to ensure that there is a backup on board in case of emergency. Superyachts come with a range of different-sized fuel tanks as well as adequate safe fuel storage facilities to allow for carrying all the fuel on board that you will need to make your journey.

Sanlorenzo Superyacht

Water purification: Access to fresh water is something that you will need to consider when making a long journey. Aside from having clean drinking water on board, fresh water is also required for a multitude of other reasons including showering, cleaning and hosing down your boat deck. Saltwater can be a sailor’s worst enemy when it comes to maintaining the integrity of a boat’s deck and purified water is the solution for this. Most superyachts will have an inbuilt water purification system onboard, but it is recommended that a backup water purification system also be carried which can be used in the event of a system breakdown and spare parts are carried for the existing system on board as well.

Navigation & Auto Pilot equipment: No matter where in the world you are venturing, navigation equipment is what will help you to get there. With the modern technology that has been developed in today’s superyachts, navigation equipment can be quite sophisticated and can pinpoint your location with an extremely high accuracy level. This is not only important to ensure that you remain on course, but in the event of an emergency, that you can broadcast your location to help or rescue vessels. Though you may have a captain or even two on board, it is also important to ensure that your autopilot equipment is able to navigate when they step away from the helm.

Sanlorenzo Superyacht

Replacement/spare parts:  Whether it’s your water purification system, your GPS or your communications equipment, there is a range of things that can go wrong on a long journey which is why it is so important to ensure that you carry a broad collection of spare parts. Repairs to a lot of equipment can be done on the go if you have the right supplies onboard so that you can continue on an uninterrupted journey. Replacement or backup equipment can also be extremely useful on journeys across the ocean as you will often find that a detour to replace something that has broken can add days to your planned schedule.

Food & drinks: While some people might choose to do it a little rough when they are crossing the ocean, superyachts have the space and the capacity to ensure that you can stock your kitchen with all your favourite options so you never miss a beat. Often a superyacht will come with a fully-equipped kitchen that includes both fridges and freezers to keep food fresh and delicious. Some are equipped with wine coolers and even have temperature-controlled rooms so that your favourite vintage can be stored in pristine conditions.

Sanlorenzo Superyacht

Superyacht features that make ocean crossings enjoyable

The sky’s the limit when it comes to the features and amenities of superyachts these days. Since sailing first became a popular activity in the early 1900s, the race has been on for designers and manufacturers to produce the world’s finest vessels. With each new release, superyachts are becoming more and more incredible and in demand for those who enjoy the finer things in life.

There is always the danger of weeks being spent at sea becoming repetitive and even boring for some, so it is important to ensure that your yacht has all the facilities you will need to entertain your passengers throughout the entire journey. The facilities onboard a modern superyacht are what will make your journey more enjoyable, no matter how long you decide to take to complete your trip.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Scuba diving equipment: No matter which ocean you choose to cross, there will undoubtedly be some stunning underwater environments that you can enjoy along the way. Some might choose to travel with a scuba professional while seasoned divers will be content with diving using the equipment that they have on board.

Jet skis: For the more adventurous sailors, there is no more thrilling feeling than flying along on a flat ocean surface. Some superyachts come equipped with jet skis or they can be hired or purchased as an additional feature to keep on board for a long journey.

Dinghies: Though being onboard a superyacht can keep you comfortable for weeks, there are always exciting things that you can see and experience on land along the way as well. It is important to ensure that a superyacht is equipped with smaller tenders which make reaching the shore a breeze whether it’s to collect supplies or enjoy a day on dry land to break up your journey.

Sanlorenzo Superyacht

Onboard entertainment: Whether it’s a karaoke room or a children’s play area that will best suit you and your fellow sailors, there are any number of facilities that can be incorporated into the design of a superyacht for the ultimate entertainment. Often, onboard hot tubs, swimming pools and waterslides are installed to complete the superyacht experience but even if you are retrofitting your onboard entertainment, the list of what you can create for the onboard entertainment of your passengers is seemingly endless.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Helicopter pad: Superyachts can be equipped with almost anything and a helicopter pad is no exception. Having access to a helicopter onboard your vessel means that guests can join the trip at a later date or leave early if they need to. This also provides you with long-range access to land to collect supplies and provides a lovely way to see islands and other incredible sights along the way.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Safety requirements for ocean crossings

With any ocean crossing the safety requirements are heightened simply due to the length of your intended journey. From having the right flares on board to a fully equipped medical centre and medically trained crew, safety features are an important consideration that must be factored into your planning for the journey.

Medical facilities: Some superyachts are equipped with medical centres to attend to personal injuries and take care of all passengers on board. The remote nature of an ocean crossing means that you will require a complete kit when it comes to being able to attend to any medical issues that could arise on board.

Medically trained crew: Some sailors may choose to travel with a licensed medical professional onboard to attend to any issues that may arise, but if this is not the case, then all crew on board a superyacht should have first aid training provided prior to the vessel’s departure.

Sanlorenzo Superyacht

Equipment: There is a range of safety equipment that ocean-faring vessels are required by law to carry onboard. From life rings to safety boats, flares and communication equipment, a thorough inspection should be made of all safety equipment before departing on a superyacht for any long journey.

Emergency planning: From running emergency drills prior to departure to having escape routes planned in case of emergencies, the planning for emergency situations before departing for an ocean crossing should be thorough and well thought-out. Designating multiple muster points on board and briefing all passengers and crew at the beginning of the journey is essential to ensuring that everyone remains safe in the case of an emergency.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

If journeying across the ocean has been a lifelong dream, a superyacht is the only way to do so in the best of styles. Superyachts can be rented for journeys such as this or for those who are looking for a superyacht to purchase to journey across the oceans.

Superyachts are an invention that has further propelled man’s need to explore the big blue oceans around the world and with the right horsepower and a well-trained crew, almost nothing is impossible in this day and age. Though crossing the Atlantic or the Pacific may have once been a seemingly impossible dream, it is now very achievable with the right vessel at hand.

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Watch CBS News

Cruise ship arrives in NYC port with 44-foot dead endangered whale caught on its bow

Updated on: May 9, 2024 / 11:41 AM EDT / CBS/AP

A cruise ship sailed into a New York City port with a 44-foot dead whale across its bow, marine authorities said.

The whale, identified as an endangered sei whale , was caught on the ship's bow when it arrived at the Port of Brooklyn on Saturday, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration fisheries spokesperson Andrea Gomez said. A necropsy conducted later confirmed the whale's species and determined that the creature was a mature female, said the Atlantic Marine Conservation Society, a nonprofit organization that conducted the exam on an marine mammal.

A spokesperson for MSC Cruises said the whale was on the MSC Meraviglia, which docked at Brooklyn before sailing to ports in New England and Canada.

whale-dead-3.jpg

"We immediately notified the relevant authorities, who are now conducting an examination of the whale," officials with the cruise line said in a statement.

"We are deeply saddened by the loss of any marine life," the officials said, adding that the Geneva-based MSC Cruises follows all regulations designed to protect whales, such as altering itineraries in certain regions to avoid hitting the animals .

The dead whale was relocated to Sandy Hook, New Jersey, and towed to shore there to allow for better access to equipment and to conduct a necropsy, Gomez said.

The necropsy, an autopsy on an animal, was conducted on Tuesday, Gomez said. Samples collected from the whale will help biologists determine whether it was already dead when it was struck by the ship, she said.

Basic results of that exam showed evidence of tissue trauma in the area of the whale's right shoulder blade and a fractured right flipper, said the Atlantic Marine Conservation Society. In a post shared Wednesday to its Facebook page, the organization also said those tests revealed the whale's gastrointestinal tract was "full of food." Samples of its organs will undergo toxicology reviews and analyses to identify any potential tissue diseases.

whale-dead.jpg

"The tissue and bone samples collected will help biologists determine if the vessel interaction occurred pre or post mortem," said the conservation society.

Sei whales are typically observed in deeper waters far from the coastline, Gomez said. They are one of the largest whale species and are internationally protected.

According to the New York Department of Environmental Conservation , sei whales eat 2,000 pounds of fish and plankton per day. They can grow up to 60 feet long, weigh as much as 50 tons and live on average between 50-70 years.

Wildlife Attractions In Kaikoura, New Zealand

The incident marks the latest endangered whale to be found dead along the East Coast.  Last month, federal authorities said a North Atlantic right whale that was found floating 50 miles offshore east of Virginia Beach, Virginia, was killed in a collision with a ship .

In March, NOAA said the first  North Atlantic right whale  baby born this season had  died after being hit by a vessel .

Environmental groups have called for tighter regulations on commercial fishing and shipping to try to save the whales.

In Massachusetts, there's a proposal to put  speed limits on fast ferries  to Cape Cod and the Islands to protect whales. The ferry companies counter that this would drastically reduce service, and say their captains have never seen a right whale on the job. 

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IMAGES

  1. Crossing The Atlantic By Motor Yacht? Everything You Need To Know

    can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

  2. Can Yachts Cross The Pacific & Atlantic Oceans?

    can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

  3. What Size Motor Yacht Can Cross The Atlantic

    can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

  4. Can Superyachts Cross The Atlantic?

    can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

  5. What Size Motor Yacht Can Cross The Atlantic

    can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

  6. Can Yachts Cross The Pacific & Atlantic Oceans?

    can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

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COMMENTS

  1. What Size Yacht To Cross The Atlantic? (Here's What You Need to Know)

    The size of yacht needed to safely and comfortably cross the Atlantic Ocean will depend on factors such as the number of people on board, the type of voyage, and the experience of the captain and crew. Generally, the vessel should be a minimum of 36 feet in length and have enough stowage capacity to carry enough supplies and provisions for the ...

  2. Crossing The Atlantic By Motor Yacht? Everything You Need To Know

    To cross the Atlantic, you'll need a boat that's at least 30 feet long, whether you're sailing or motoring. For safety and comfort, your boat should be at least 40 feet long. Although the experience of sailing or motoring across the Atlantic is vastly different, both require a boat of this size. If you plan on having a crew on board, you ...

  3. Can Yachts Cross the Ocean

    Yes, mega yachts and superyachts can cross the Atlantic or the Pacific Ocean. We know it would take a superyacht around 10 days to cross, but the Pacific Ocean is a larger body of water for superyachts to cross but it is possible to do so. When yachts are traveling from the US to areas such as Fiji or the Islands of Tahiti, the boats will sail ...

  4. The right yacht for an Atlantic crossing

    Last year, when we carried out our annual survey of ARC skippers, we found that yachts of between 46ft and 55ft had a battery capacity, on average, of 700ah, rising to 1,000ah for yachts over 56ft ...

  5. How Far Can Yachts Travel? Helpful Examples (With Numbers)

    A 95-foot yacht with a 9000-liter fuel tank can travel up to 1,200 nautical miles. A 40-foot yacht with a 5,000-liter fuel tank can travel up to 3,000 nautical miles. Think of it this way: the bigger the boat, the bigger the fuel compartment. ... To cross the Atlantic, an average motorized yacht would need a tank with a capacity of about 5000 ...

  6. Best Yachts for Transatlantic Crossing: Our Selection and Advice for 2023

    The best yachts for a transatlantic crossing. Neel 51. Outremer 5X. Hallberg-Rassy 57. There are many yachts which are suitable for a transatlantic passage. Some will be less expensive, some will be more comfortable, faster, or better suited to you, your experience, and your budget.

  7. Preparing to cross the Atlantic

    And completing an Atlantic crossing is the dream of many a sailor. But the sea can be a formidable mistress so it pays to prepare well, making sure everything is ship shape before a longer ocean passage, right down to the last sail tie. ... A versatile sub-70 foot sailboat offering the perfect balance of size and practicality. She can be sailed ...

  8. Ocean Going Yacht Buying Guide 2023

    Yes, a 40-foot yacht can cross the Atlantic Ocean if she is suitably prepared and outfitted to do so. Ocean going yachts are for those looking to explore the world; who want to throw off the bow lines and leave the safe harbor to see what lies across the ocean. There are many types of yachts that can safely travel the ocean; to see some of the ...

  9. How to sail across the Atlantic and back

    A 35-footer might take 25-28 days to sail across the Atlantic from the Canaries to the West Indies. Obviously, the longer and faster your boat is, the more stowage and water tankage you will have for less time at sea. You might also ask yourself which parts of the adventure are the most valuable to you.

  10. Crossing the Atlantic Ocean on a Trawler Yacht

    Experienced cruisers often discover Kadey-Krogen Yachts because they begin to search for yachts capable of crossing the Atlantic. If one searches the listings for Transatlantic boats for sale or contacts a broker with a very specific request to hear about yachts that can cross the Atlantic, they're bound to discover plenty of superyachts, and some custom trawlers, and, of course, a selection ...

  11. Time to Cross the Atlantic by Sailboat: A Comprehensive Guide

    An Atlantic crossing on a sailboat takes an average of 20 to 25 days. It is important to know the shortcuts, maximize speed, and have experience to cross the Atlantic. The best time to cross the Atlantic is between November and February. The total distance of the trip can be as much as 4,000 nautical miles.

  12. Guide to Atlantic crossing by sailboat or catamaran

    The classic route to cross the Atlantic by sailboat begins in Europe and ends in the Caribbean or more rarely somewhere else in Central America. A common example of a transatlantic crossing departing from the Canary Islands with a possible stop in Cape Verde and landing in the Antilles. The distance of the crossing from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean is about 2800-3000 nautical miles ...

  13. Crossing the Atlantic by Motor Yacht Routes

    Conclusion. There are many ways to cross the Atlantic by motor yacht, but there are three main routes that are most popular. The first route is from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean. This route is popular because it offers good weather and sailing conditions. The second route is from the Azores to Bermuda.

  14. Can A Yacht Make It Across The Atlantic? (Factors To Consider)

    The Atlantic is a notoriously windy ocean and can be treacherous in the winter months. -Make sure you have a good weather forecast and are prepared for rough seas. -Make sure the sails are in good condition, the hull is clean and free of barnacles, and the engine is well-maintained. -Finally, you need to make sure your yacht is in good condition.

  15. Can Superyachts Cross The Atlantic?

    Superyachts can definitely cross the Atlantic - some with absolute ease. There are routes from the United States to Europe that stretch for just over three thousand miles, a distance which some superyachts can swallow up in no time. They're also big enough to handle any adverse Atlantic weather. Read on to learn more about superyachts and ...

  16. Can Yachts Cross The Pacific & Atlantic Oceans?

    Both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans can be crossed in a yacht. You can cross the Pacific and Atlantic oceans on a sailing yacht or a motor yacht. It would be best to have a big enough tank to hold the amount of fuel you expect to burn. This being said, not all yachts are capable of making these trips.

  17. What kind of boats cross the Atlantic Ocean? 7 Options explained

    There are also sailing cargo Atlantic crossing possibilities out there. ' Tres Hombres ' is a 32 metres Schooner transporting traditional goods like rum and chocolate between the Caribbean and Europe. Timbercoast is a 1920 built 43.5m Schooner that transports goods like coffee and gin.

  18. How to cross the Atlantic in short hops

    Here's how he did it: 1 Newfoundland to southern Greenland. During July, high pressure is typically centred just south-west/west of the Azores with ridging extending south-west/west towards ...

  19. How To Cross the Atlantic, Routes and Timelines

    25 MPH. Airplane. 2010. London - New York. 8 Hours. 478 Knots. 550 MPH. Table comparing time to complete an Atlantic crossing. Looking at this table we can clearly see that the time it takes to cross the Atlantic has decreased exponentially.

  20. What Boat Do You Need For An Ocean Crossing?

    A yacht is suitable for sailing across the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Sailing or motor yacht can travel between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. It is in your best interest to have a fuel tank that is spacious enough to carry the amount of fuel you anticipate using. That said, not all yachts can do these kinds of journeys.

  21. Life-changing voyage: Sailing solo across the Atlantic in a 22ft sloop

    Flying Cloud is hardly the ideal yacht for sailing across the Atlantic TAGS: atlantic crossing solo sailing. On a cloudy midsummer afternoon, my best friend, Harry Scott, and I waved goodbye to ...

  22. This $12 Million Yacht Can Cross the Atlantic Twice on a Single Tank

    A sleek, lavish megayacht fit for a Bond villain, called "Adastra," has hit the market for $12 million. Thanks to its efficient shape and lightweight construction, the yacht can cross the Atlantic ...

  23. Can Superyachts Cross the Ocean?

    Though superyachts are mainly designed for pleasure, they also have the ability to cross oceans. From Hong Kong to Seattle and Melbourne to Tokyo, most superyachtscan sail the seas with relative ease. This is attributed to the strength of the engines and the capability of the vessel to handle potentially rough sea conditions.

  24. Cruise ship arrives in NYC port with 44-foot dead endangered whale

    A cruise ship sailed into a New York City port with a 44-foot dead whale across its bow, marine authorities said. ... They can grow up to 60 feet long, weigh as much as 50 tons and live on average ...