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Corsair F-24 Boat Test

The corsair f-24 mk i cooks up a budget-friendly taste of fast..

corsair trimaran review

In May 1999 Practical Sailor reviewed the then-new Corsair F-24 Mark II trimaran. Nearly 20 years later, were here to follow up with a focus on the Corsair F-24 Mark I, a boat that can represent a good value today since many newer designs have entered the market.

The late Ian Farrier (1947-2017) designed fast, trailerable trimarans for more than 40 years. A New Zealander, his first production success was the 18-foot Trailertri. His 19-foot Tramp was Boat-of-the-Year in Australia in 1981. In 1983 John Walton (of the Wal Mart family) founded Corsair to build high-performance multihulls, lured Farrier to Chula Vista, California, and the result was the very popular F-27 ( PS September 1990 ). Almost 500 have been sold since it went into production in 1985. It has since been superceded by the F-28.

In 1991, Corsair added the F-24 Sport Cruiser. This abbreviated version of the F-27, with a starting price more than 30 percent lower than the F-27, was designed to be affordable.

While she remained sharp in the performance department, her accommodations were even more spartan. We spoke with Ian Farrier several times about anchoring and cruising; it was pretty clear that his heart was in racing and he even suggested we were probably better in tune with the needs and practicalities of small multi-hull cruising than he was. Still, he designed a cabin that can handily do both, if you can accept the compromises.

Corsair F-24 Boat

The deck layout is similar to the typical 24-foot monohull, except that it is wide-18 feet-with wing trampolines on both sides. In addition to providing stability, this gives lounging space in fair weather and greatly increases safety in rough weather. Though lacking railings and lifelines-other than a pulpit and wrap-around stern rail-its hard to fall off the F-24 if jacklines and tethers are used. A single large Lewmar foredeck hatch provides ample ventilation. The cockpit will easily seat six, but three is more comfortable for vigorous sailing.

The cockpit is equipped with four Lewmar 16 winches (the jib winches are one-speed self-tailers, the reacher winches are standard two-speed), two multi-line jammers, and ten cam cleats. All essential sail controls, including halyards, are accessible from the cockpit, making for easy single-handed sailing.

The mainsail furls by winding around the boom; fast, convenient, and very gentle on the typical Mylar/carbon laminate sails. Reefing requires a quick trip to the mast to crank the boom around and attach the down haul, but that is it. The set up makes a vang impractical but few multihulls use them anyway, preferring to control the boom with the traveler.

The bow anchor locker holds two anchors and two rodes, so long as they are folding designs. Trimarans are best anchored using a bridle; the test boat uses a 20-foot Dyneema bridle that is retracted onto the wing nets when not in use.

The typical 6 horsepower outboard delivers about 5.3 knots at 1/3 throttle and about 6.5 knots wide open. The side mount provides decent performance in chop, pitching less than transom-mounted engines.

The portable fuel tank is protected from the sun and solar heating in an under-seat locker. It is wide is open for venting (but sealed from the cabin) and drains out through the open transom, safe and out of the way.

Since the emphasis was fast cruising and racing, storage and amenities are sparse. In the cabin there is storage behind the seat backs. The large rectangular top-opening lockers in the galley counter and under the seats can be fitted with hanging bags for easier access.

The head compartment has sufficient space for toilet paper and cleaning supplies. There is a large bottomless locker in the cockpit that also provides access to under cockpit areas. Lockers in the amas (outriggers) can hold light, bulky items.

There is sitting head room and ample seating for four on the starboard settee. An Origo alcohol stove and sink with rocker pump provide a minimal galley. A large cooler slides easily under the companionway. The forward V-berth is quite long, though a little pinched at the foot. The settee converts into a twin-sized bed using filler boards that slide neatly into storage slots under the companionway.

A portable head sits in a well behind a curtain, and is typically moved into the cockpit at bedtime for better privacy. Some owners rate the interior as poor, but most call it camping-out comfortable, suitable for an overnight or weekend.

Performance

Everyone wants to know how fast the little trimaran will go. To windward it points as well as most monohulls, thanks to a deep centerboard. Shell tack through less than 90 degrees if you pinch, though it’s faster if you bear off just a little. Keeping up with 40-foot cruisers is easy on any point of the sail, and you quickly chase them down on a reach.

With the wind free, expect to match true wind speed up to about 12 knots, after which you may reef or bleed power, depending on your mood. In lighter winds, pop out the reacher and you’ll get a whole new gear, easily exceeding wind speed.

In stronger winds, bear off until the true wind is on the quarter, and you’ll see 14 knots or more, although handling requires sharp attention if you haven’t reefed.

Compared to the Stiletto 27 (see PS July 2016), it is more weatherly, tacks faster, can safely handle more wind, but is slightly slower off the wind (though not as scary).

Upwind reefing begins at about 15 knots true for those who like fast sailing, but there is no reason not to reef a little earlier and enjoy more relaxed, but still spirited sailing. Maximum angle of heel is about 15 degrees.

With two reefs and the jib rolled up a little, shell take quite a lot of wind, perhaps 30 knots, without much excitement. Upwind in 20 knots is fun with the right reefs in, and that’s pretty good for a 24-foot boat. Farrier designed these conservatively, with windy conditions in mind. They are quite popular on San Francisco Bay, an area known for strong breezes.

The Mark II was touted as the new and improved version of the Mark I. By replacing the centerboard with a daggerboard, weight was reduced, and a rotating mast increased power, making the Mark II noticeably faster. The Mark I has more usable cabin space, since the centerboard case is hidden inside the settee, and the Mark I cockpit is also several feet longer, a boon to fun daysailing.

The centerboard is also a blessing in shoal water, automatically pivoting up if it smells the bottom, instead of breaking things when you find a sandbar at 15 knots. The Mark I has a kick-up rudder fitted into a cassette, keeping it under the boat, while the Mark II has a transom hung rudder. The Mark I works as a day sailor and weekender, while racers prefer the Mark II.

As with any multihull, there is always the capsize canard. Sailed poorly, any sailboat can capsize, says Farrier. My designs are not immune to this. With over 1,000 Farriers now sailing, even a low 1 percent capsize ratio would mean 10 capsizes a year. However, the capsize rate actually appears to be averaging .03 percent.

Large ocean-going monohull yachts are foundering annually, sometimes with loss of life. The basic safety difference is that the monohulls ultimate stability is resting on the bottom, while the multihulls is floating on top.

Reef appropriately and the risk is truly small. F-27s have completed successful transpacific and transatlantic crossings, and even the first circumnavigation of the North Pole under sail. Finally, the F-24 can’t sink. Built-in foam flotation, light construction, and multiple crash tanks in the amas and foam-filled akas (cross beams) make this impossible.

The F-24s main hull is fine, with a V-entry forward, U-sections mid-ships, and a relatively flat transom to damp pitching and provide lift for planing. Going to weather, most of the weight is on the amas, with fine V-sections that cut nicely through waves. Powering through short chop is not a strong suit among multihulls, but she has demonstrated considerable ability in choppy waters such as San Francisco Bay and the Chesapeake.

The heart of Farriers designs is the patented Farrier Folding System. Refined over the years, the mechanism allows the akas to fold-up, which reduces the F-24s beam from 17 feet 11 inches to 8 feet 2 inches.

We kept our F-24 in a small boat marina for a time, folding after every sail; we did this while motoring in the channel, requiring only a few minutes of light effort by one person.

While the claim of trailering to sailing in 20 minutes may be true for seasoned crews that race every weekend, allow two hours for the transition if you do this only occasionally.

Although no single step is physically difficult for a single person, there are many steps and a second pair of hands makes for safer work. The engineering has proved very reliable, and now that the patents have expired, copies abound.

Construction

Performance multihulls built to their designed displacements are hardly ever built on production lines. Corsair has been the exception to that rule. Light weight is an essential if you want a cat or trimaran to sail up to its speed potential, but you’re not likely to achieve it with normal materials and common construction techniques.

Turning out an F-24 that weighs 1,800 pounds (1,650 pounds for the Mark II) is no simple matter. It involves almost 50 separate molded parts, considerably more than same-length monohulls.

Carbon fiber and Kevlar reinforcement, vacuum-bagging, double-biased fabrics, acrylic-modified epoxy resin, and NPG gelcoat are all elements you’d expect to see in a custom shop. They all go into the F-24.

Glass/resin control, published laminate schedules, a computer-generated production protocol, universally bonded top hat joints between hull and deck, barrier coats of vinyl ester resin, isopthalic resin throughout the rest of the laminate, and bulkheads tabbed in seven places to the hull makes for a light but sturdy boat.

The akas appear to be held in place by the anchor bolts inserted when unfolding, but the sailing forces are actually carried by strong pivot arms connecting the akas to anchor points near the waterline, anchored deep within the hull, and by compression blocks where the arms meet the hull at deck level.

After 20 years we’ve had a few minor issues related to failed bedding and damage to the balsa core, but nothing affecting the main structural elements.

Conclusions

Whether you’re downsizing from a cruising cat, or upsizing from the family Hobie, the F-24 offers the sports car of youthful dreams, on a budget.

Is it worth paying three times as much as you would for a 24-foot mono-hull with more room? Not if you’re looking for cabin space and need an enclosed head. On the other hand, if fun sailing is the goal, the dollar-to-grin ratio is very high. Market demand is dependable and you will get your money back. It’s not the best beginners boat.

You can’t just sheet-and-forget, and getting the best from her requires experience and attention. But if you have a beach cat or fast dinghy background, it’s a great way to gain weekender capability without losing any of the fun. If you need a little more comfort or more speed, look at the Corsair F-27. And if money is no object there’s a world of Farrier designs to choose from.

Corsair F-24 Boat Test

Cruising in an F-24 is a tiny step above camping, but for the bare-bones cruiser who wants to cover some ground quickly, it fits the bill quite handily.

1. An alcohol stove and a small sink serve the micro-galley. 2. The V-berth is tight, but the convertible settee in the main cabin makes a twin-sized bed. 3. The porta-potty sits under the V-berth. It is often moved to the cockpit at night while sleeping. 4. A folding table seats one for dining.

Corsair F-24 Boat Test

  • Fast, weatherly, and quick to tack.
  • Stable. Only 15 degrees heel.
  • Reefing starts at about 18 knots apparent.
  • Easy to fold from 18-foot beam to
  • 8-foot in about two minutes.
  • Roomy cockpit. Tramps are fun in the summer.
  • Eighteen-foot beam makes it hard to fall off.
  • Well-built with stout rigging.
  • Cramped cabin. No standing headroom and few amenities.
  • Limited storage space.
  • Portable head and no head compartment.
  • Quick motion.
  • Slow under power.

Corsair F-24 Boat Test

  • Corsair Marine

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By far the most comprehensive review of the F-24 I was able to find online. Many thanks for the write-up, very informative and helpful.

Lakeside Marine & Motorsports has been awarded Best of Forsyth Boat and Marine Service as well as Used Boat Sales. Please contact us for any kind of Boat work or Purchase.

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Corsair 36, Fast Cruising Tri

  • By John Burnham
  • Updated: June 7, 2005

corsair trimaran review

What I thought was the weirdest thing about the boat at first turned out to be one of its outstanding features. The Corsair 36 has a stern deck at the back of the cockpit with two large bench seats made of mesh and stainless steel tubes, and they looked bizarre. But after a day or two of cruising with my wife and three daughters, I looked at those seats with complete appreciation. They were the most coveted, comfortable places from which our crew would sunbathe, snooze, and read. If I was lucky, sometimes I even got to sit in one to steer.

I’d been looking forward to cruising on Corsair’s new flagship and comparing it to our experience on the 31 a few years earlier ( “It’s Not All About Speed,” March ’01 ). Like the 31, the 36 is built with a vacuum-bagged foam/glass sandwich laminate, plus carbon and Kevlar reinforcing. The beams are made entirely with carbon, and the overall weight is a little over 2,000 pounds more than the 31. With 817 square feet of upwind sail area, the tri was fast-roughly as fast as the 31, but without the same twitch in the gut when it accelerated. Under main alone we broad-reached across a windy Vineyard Sound doing a relaxed 12 knots. Later, on a beam reach in about 12 knots on Narragansett Bay, with my 12-year-old daughter steering (one hand on the tiller extension, one hand holding a book), our speed jumped from 11 knots to 15.3 as I trimmed in the main and the sprit-mounted genoa (known as a screacher). And when I crewed in a local race with Multihull Source dealer Bob Gleason, we saw 17 knots on a tight reach. I’m told that reaching speeds in the low 20s are common, but what impressed me most was the light-air trip we made from Martha’s Vineyard, to Jamestown, R.I., in seven hours-40 miles upwind. To me that’s the big benefit of a boat like the 36; you can sail it quickly and quietly, eating up the miles while others are going no faster under iron genoa.

Because of its larger accommodations, compared to the 31, the 36 got the thumbs-up from my daughters. But it’s still a trimaran with a relatively skinny main hull; that’s the price you pay for speed. The narrow waterline reduces storage, but the hull flares outboard above the waterline, which provides room for an enclosed head on one side of the daggerboard trunk, as well as the dinette, which converts to a small double berth. There’s also a small galley area to starboard with a sink and two-burner alcohol stove.

On our boat, the fridge had been removed and an Igloo cooler was used in place of the bottom companionway step; but the standard configuration has a 12-volt fridge to port, just forward of the dinette area. An option is available for a propane-fired stove and propane on-demand hot water. There were five of us aboard, with two girls in the forward cabin, one in the dinette double, and the adults in the aft double, which is reached by lifting part or all of the stern deck at the back of the cockpit. We loved sleeping in that wide aft berth, although getting in and out required agility, and changing clothes in there was like dressing inside a tent. We decided if there were a follow-up cruise, we’d claim the forward cabin and move the girls aft.

Despite the constraints of the interior, the on-deck living spaces are expansive. With amas and trampolines to port and starboard, a small foredeck, plus the stern seats, any of the five of us could escape the others when we felt like it. We could easily carry our tenders-single and double kayaks lashed between the forward and aft beam on one side-and the large-volume outer hulls had plenty of room for storing anchors, paddles, even garbage. On the foredeck and forward beam, we found plenty of room to take solar showers and/or have some fun by dashing outboard and swinging off the spinnaker halyard. Speaking of solar devices, a flexible solar panel lived on the cabintop or port netting and provided an all-day trickle charge to our batteries.

The 36 we sailed was one of the first built, and while we were racing in hard reaching conditions, we heard a crack at theinboard end of the forward beam. Installed under the beam’sinboard end was a fiberglass block that gives a tight fit for the beam after it’s unfolded and bolted to the main hull. “The block we made,” says Paul Koch, Corsair’s president and design team member, “wasn’t up to the job. We’ve replaced it on all boats with a stronger aluminum casting.” Hull No. 8 is under construction at press time.

Overall, I liked the boat’s sailhandling systems-a full-length traveler across the stern deck and pairs of winches for main, jib, and screacher or spinnaker. While racing, I went forward to help with the asymmetric spinnaker and found that it was too big for me to take down to windward unless the skipper was willing to bear off. (For some reason he wanted to keep sailing toward the mark, so we dropped it to leeward instead.) But while cruising, the combination of the roller-furling headsails (jib and screacher) and a mainsail equipped with lazy jacks and jiffy reefing made sailhandling easy.

It was tough to balance on the boom to remove the full-length batten in the square-top mainsail, and I figured that was another small price to pay for performance. I learned later from sailmaker Dave Calvert that a quick-pin on a new Tides Marine batten-car design now releases the head so the batten can lie flat along the boom. Under power, with a 15-hp, long-shaft, four-stroke Honda, the 36 moved well and steered easily thanks to a small bar that is dropped into place to link the top of the engine and the outboard, kick-up rudder. An electric starter and power tilt made getting underway simple.

Compared to other Corsairs, which go on and off their trailers quickly, the 36 is a much more substantial boat. It’s considered a “transportable,” not a “trailerable” boat, in the sense that it’s not the type of boat you’ll launch for a quick afternoon sail. Except when traveling to new sailing areas, it will probably live on the end of a dock or a mooring-or in about five minutes it can also be folded up to fit in a slip. Manufacturer estimates for stepping the mast and launching are about two hours.

If your kids like to read and swim and you like to sail from harbor to harbor-whether at 17 knots in a breeze or 6 knots in light airs, go for a test sail . With a few agile, fit crewmembers to manage the spinnaker, you can race it hard as well. Whatever you do, don’t let the funky bench seats put you off.

Corsair 36 LOA 36’0″ LWL 35’0″ Beam (overall) 25’7″ Beam (folded) 9’10” DSPL 5,500 lbs. Draft (hull only) 1’8″ Draft (daggerboard down) 6’0″ Mast length 47’6″ Sail area 817 sq. ft. (1,084 w/screacher) Base price $208,000 www.corsairmarine.com

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Quick Look: Corsair Dash 750

  • By Alvah Simon
  • Updated: December 23, 2009

corsair trimaran review

With enhanced performance and improved livability, the 24-foot-long Dash 750 trimaran replaces the popular Corsair F-24 Mark II. It weighs less than 2,000 pounds and folds up to a street-legal width of 8 feet 2 inches, so this trailerable trimaran will appeal to the backwater gunkholer as well as the need-for-speed junkie.

Using a clever hinging system for the hulls, a convenient tabernacle for the mast, and a retractable bowsprit, the Dash 750 requires only a wrench and 30 minutes to rig. Load some weekend supplies into the twin-berth interior, complete with stove, sink, portable toilet, and 12-volt electricity supply, and head out for a relaxing weekend of beach camping, or rendezvous with kindred spirits for some blistering class racing. And blister it will, for the Dash 750 simply rips. Are you ready to match boat speed to wind speed, knot for knot, well up into the 20s? Simply said, the Dash 750 is portable, affordable, fast, and fun.

LOA 24′ 3″ LWL 24′ 1″ Beam 18′ 2″/8′ 2″ Draft 5′ 5″ Sail Area 305 sq. ft. Weight 1,824 lb. Water 3 gal. Fuel 3 gal. Engine 5-hp. Nissan outboard Designer Corsair Marine Price $88,975 Corsair Marine (877) 327-8874 www.corsairmarine.com

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Trimaran Review Of The Corsair 37CR

Corsair has recently graced Australia with a new design that reflects the best attributes of a catamaran. Corsair has now been bought out by the most predominant catamaran manufacturer in Australia. So this latest design success comes as no surprise. Seawind is the big catamaran builder on the world’s only continent-country and now they’ve acquired this well-known Vietnamese boat building company. The fusion of styles is certainly synergistic!

Cruisers in other parts of the world may think of a folding boat as being flimsy because they aren’t well acquainted with Corsair, which is mainly famous in Australia. Corsairs have circumnavigated the globe in cruise mode, even in the treacherous glacier-laden Southern Ocean, proving they are very durable!

Corsair 37 Trimaran Review

Corsair 37 Trimaran Reviews

The Corsair 37 was designed by Ian Farrier, who was well known for the clean boating designs he made for Kiwi from 1985 through 2000. Farrier has since departed from Kiwi and has been very successful in using his artistic genius to create his own boats.

His signature “F” and “C” displays his signature branding and an estimated seventy Australian boats are floating in the water, showcasing his trademark.

The Corsair 37 appeals have peaked high in trimaran Reviews because of the unique features that make it ideal for cruising as well as make it a good pick for sailors seeking a nautical performance vehicle. This thirty-seven-foot trimaran is on the market for a little over three hundred twenty-five thousand dollars.

Included in this price is its outboard motor. For boaters with a need for speed, there’s another version made entirely of carbon to be significantly lighter. Since carbon is expensive to cut and assemble, it drives the boat’s price up by around sixty-five thousand more dollars.

Corsair 37 Specifications

Specs Trimaran Reviews

The Corsair 37 CR is rapidly growing in popularity based on trimaran Reviews. Part of the reason why buyers are so quick to recommend the 37CR is due to the specs that are hard to find in similar style boats. The LOA is thirty-seven feet. Its LWL is thirty-five feet.

The beam is twenty-five feet and seven inches when in use; when it is folded it measures nine foot ten inches. The hull portion of the draft comes out to be one foot eight inches. The entire draft measures seven feet and seven inches. The mast length is a whopping fifty-one feet and two inches. It weighs sixth thousand seven hundred pounds, and its maximum recommended auxiliary is twenty horsepower.

The entire draft measures seven feet and seven inches. The mast length is a whopping fifty-one feet and two inches. It weighs sixth thousand seven hundred pounds, and its maximum recommended auxiliary is twenty horsepower.

Standard Features

Features Corsair 37 Trimaran Reviews

Based on trimaran Reviews the Corsair 37CR has some of the best features one could find in a trimaran. Some of the things worth mentioning are the standard version is a cruising main and mainsail lazy cradle. A North Sails brand roller furling jib also is included. There is a folding mechanism made of trustworthy aluminum to be both durable and lightweight.

A North Sails brand roller furling jib also is included. There is a folding mechanism made of trustworthy aluminum to be both durable and lightweight.

There is a jib spinnaker . Screecher halyards come with the trimaran to make boating easier. A pivoting carbon fiber wing area mast with a main is also weather-resistant and light. The boom and bowsprit are also made of carbon. The boom has internal outhaul land-in boom fixtures specially designed for slab reefing. There are man-made shrouds and a stainless steel head stay.

The winches are amazing too. They are one of the most talked-about features of the Corsair 37CR in trimaran Reviews. The 37CR has two Harken b40.2 self-tailing central winches on top of the cabin with two 10 inch handles. Then there’re two Harken b32.2 self-tailing halyard winches positioned on the mast with 4 Spinlock XCS Clutches for the ropes, but it doesn’t stop there.

There’s also two Harken a42.2 primary sheet winches and two Harken a42.2 coaming winches. Harken is one of the leaders in high-quality winches worldwide, something most experienced boaters will appreciate. Owners will also receive a Harken traveler control, two jib sheets, and a Harken big boat traveler car with their purchase of the 37CR.

Then there’re two Harken b32.2 self-tailing halyard winches positioned on the mast with 4 Spinlock XCS Clutches for the ropes, but it doesn’t stop there. There’s also two Harken a42.2 primary sheet winches and two Harken a42.2 coaming winches. Harken is one of the leaders in high-quality winches worldwide, something most experienced boaters will appreciate. Owners will also receive a Harken traveler control, two jib sheets, and a Harken big boat traveler car with their purchase of the 37CR.

Harken is one of the leaders in high-quality winches worldwide, something most experienced boaters will appreciate. Owners will also receive a Harken traveler control, two jib sheets, and a Harken big boat traveler car with their purchase of the 37CR.

The bowsprit comes with deck fixtures for the screecher and the spinnaker. The jib further included is also made by Harken. There are two 10 X 10 hatches in the main cabin area. One is located in the head, and one is directly inside the main cabin.

There is one hatch in the foredeck, and each float has its hatch. There is an escape hatch in the cabin of the aft, and there are three portlights with one last aft accessible hatch. All hatch boards are made from tinted polycarbonate for a style that blends in with the rest of the trimaran.

The self-draining anchor locker that comes with every Corsair 37CR will save those on board a lot of work. The electrical system is simple to understand, and troubleshooting should never prove tedious as it comes with a test meter. It is a simple system with a breaker panel, double battery selector switch, and a twelve Volt accessory outlet. This will supply power to the navigation system and the foredeck and cabin lights. The only things that are not included are the batteries.

It is a simple system with a breaker panel, double battery selector switch, and a twelve Volt accessory outlet. This will supply power to the navigation system and the foredeck and cabin lights. The only things that are not included are the batteries.

Some other great features of the 37CR are the VHF masthead antenna and the compass. Tinted polycarbonate cabin windows match the hatch boards and keep the sun from being unbearable while looking outside at the fantastic view passengers can only get from being on the water.

Two storage compartments are located inside the cockpits. The seating areas are designed to be comfortable and stern, and pulpit rails are available nearby in case things get a little bumpy at sea. There’s a twelve Volt refrigerator built into the boat, and the main cabin galley has pressured cold water and a stainless steel sink.

There is also a two-burner stove for cooking on board. Passengers will also be delighted by the transom shower and the enclosed head compartment with a shower, vanity, and pump-out system.

Sailing can be performed manually, which is something most experienced captains prefer. Getting in and out of the trimaran is a breeze thanks to the boarding ladder with transom mounting.

The Corsair Trimaran 37 CR is also getting good trimaran Reviews because it was built to meet all CE International standards as well as ISO standards. A sailing manual is included with the boat at the time of purchase.

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A small trimaran for having fun and enjoying your sailing…

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The F-28 test took us to Saint-Malo (Brittany, France), where we met Guy Albaret, director of La Landriais Marines Services shipyard, which imports the Corsair trimaran line into France. The F-24, F-31, and now the F-28, designed by Ian Farrier, are made near San Diego, California. We may find ourselves, along the French coastlines, crossing, or perhaps being passed by one of the 35 Corsair F-series trimarans sailing there regularly

A Real Trailerable Multihull

In fact, the F-28's true role is to succeed the F-27, 450 of which were built. At first glance, you might not necessarily spot the difference with respect to any other sports cruising trimaran. There is nothing in the boat’s general appearance to suggest it is a trailerable folding trimaran. A closer look and a demonstration shows that it takes one person alone little more than 2 minutes to fold both cross arms holding the amas, almost effortlessly, so that the F-28 can be trailered easily. Three steps prepare an F-28 for trailering: 1. Releasing the shrouds through a lever system at the base of each shroud 2. Disconnecting the four lock bolts on the cross arms 3. Raising the cross-beams to fold the amas against the hulls very easily thanks to a patented system The side trampolines move with the amas to come alongside the central hull. This is a really surprising operation, except for those already familiar with Corsair trimarans. The F-24, F-27 and F-31 have been using this mechanism for ten years now. This goes to show the reliability, robustness and functionality of the folding system. Consequently, this is a 6 meters wide trimaran tha...

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Eric Ravenscraft

Review: Corsair Scimitar Elite Wireless Mouse

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I've been using the same gaming mouse for as long as I can remember: the Logitech G600 . It has 12 thumb buttons that I use just as much for work as for play. But I've wanted a wireless version for a while, and it's overdue for an upgrade. After more than a decade of waiting, I’ve started looking elsewhere . The Corsair Scimitar Elite Wireless caught my wandering eye.

Much like on my trusty G600, the 12 thumb buttons on the Scimitar Elite Wireless have a ton of customization options. Each button can be mapped to another single key or combination of keys. In games like Overwatch 2 , I can map buttons that are typically hard to reach with fingers on my left hand to more convenient thumb buttons. It’s a small change, but it makes my games so much easier when I don't have to reach for the Ctrl button.

Corsair’s iCue software can do a lot more than simple key remaps too. Macros let me record repeatable actions or even past text blocks (handy when I’m writing repetitive emails), and profiles can automatically change based on what application I’m using, so I can have certain macros for writing, editing, and adjusting photos.

All of that is stuff I could do with my Logitech G600, but what makes the Scimitar Elite special is how Corsair improved on the hardware.

A Custom Fit

The 12 side buttons on the Scimitar Elite sit on a concave grid that aligns to the curve of my right thumb. Since it can be difficult to tell one of 12 buttons from another by touch alone, Corsair has given each alternating row of buttons a textured surface. On the middle button of the second row, there's an extra nub, similar to the kind you find on the F and J keys of most keyboards, to help orient your fingers.

Black computer mouse with 12 buttons on the left side sitting on a wooden surface

While I prefer Logitech’s Dual-Dish layout, which divides the 12 buttons into two smaller “dishes” of six buttons each, Corsair’s solution is quite workable. It took a little time for me to adjust my muscle memory, but before long I was able to play games with just as much fluidity as I had on my G600.

More interestingly, Corsair has added an extra bit of precision customization to the Scimitar Elite Wireless: The entire 12-button panel can be slid forward or backward to fit precisely where your thumb lands. I found this particularly welcome, because my muscle memory from the G600 had my thumb resting on the middle button of the third row, but Corsair’s resting nub expects my thumb to rest on the second row. Adjusting the panel helped me map it to my preference.

A Wireless Upgrade

The main thing I needed that my G600 didn’t have was a wireless option. The Scimitar Elite Wireless has two connectivity options; a slider on the bottom can swap between Bluetooth or a 2.4-Ghz wireless dongle.

I tend to use the wireless dongle connected to my desktop, since it provides a faster, more stable connection for games like Overwatch 2 .

I use Bluetooth for connecting to my laptop, which makes swapping devices as easy as flipping the switch on the bottom. However, there are occasions when I might want the low latency of the wireless dongle even with my laptop, and Corsair has that covered as well.

A small compartment on the bottom of the Scimitar Elite can hold a low-profile wireless dongle. A tiny cover keeps it from falling out and protects it when not in use. This makes it much easier to grab my mouse and throw it in a bag without worrying I’ll lose that competitive edge.

A Comfortable Grip

Designing the weight and feel of any mouse is a delicate balance. To my taste, Corsair nails it here. To the right of the right-click button, there’s a small indentation with a grippy texture that sits under the ring finger. It provides a perfect point of contact to nudge the mouse around without accidentally clicking either of the main buttons. It’s a subtle design choice, but I appreciated it while whipping my mouse around in my games.

The scroll wheel has a similarly grippy texture and a satisfying incremental click. Just behind the scroll wheel is a small button that can also be customized in the iCue software. By default, it’s used to swap DPI levels, which can come in handy if you need to swap sensitivities while playing FPS games that use multiple weapons.

Left Top view of black computer mouse with scrolling wheel in the center. Right Back view of black computer mouse with...

The mouse charges using a USB-C port on the front, making it possible to use while connected to your computer (looking at you, weird Apple mice). Corsair claims the Scimitar Elite Wireless will last for up to 120 hours on a single charge with the built-in lighting turned off, though the convenient charging port meant I rarely felt the need to charge at all. If I was at my desk, I would plug it in. Even if you never plug it in, it can last up to two weeks, eight hours a day, without needing a charge.

After years of using the G600, it’s hard to win me over. While I’m still using it on my desktop, I’ve finally found the wireless version I can take with me when I travel. The Scimitar Elite Wireless is comfortable, convenient, and brings all the power of my macros with me, without needing a bulky cord.

If Logitech ever finally makes a wireless follow-up to my favorite mouse, I’ll check it out. Until then, I’m happy Corsair is picking up the slack.

IMAGES

  1. Corsair 880 Trimaran 2021 Review by SAIL Magazine

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  2. Corsair 880 Trimaran 2021 Review by SAIL Magazine

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  3. Corsair 880 Trimaran

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  4. Corsair 880 review by a Corsair 24 MKII owner

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  5. 5 reasons why the Corsair 760 trimaran is your Multihull of the Year

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  6. Corsair 880 Trimaran

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VIDEO

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  2. Slick Corsair Trimaran All Tucked into Santa Cruz Harbor

  3. Sailing a corsair 24 trimaran & kitesurfing Shark Bay Western Australia 2015

  4. 2023 Governor's Cup...Corsair Trimaran Sailing at its finest :)

  5. Corsair F-31R Trimaran Snags Racing Mark

  6. Is The Drake Corsair Worth It? *Buyers Beware* (Star Citizen Ship Review)

COMMENTS

  1. Corsair F-24 Boat Test

    In May 1999 Practical Sailor reviewed the then-new Corsair F-24 Mark II trimaran. Nearly 20 years later, were here to follow up with a focus on the Corsair F-24 Mark I, a boat that can represent a good value today since many newer designs have entered the market. The late Ian Farrier (1947-2017) designed fast, trailerable trimarans for more ...

  2. Boat Review: Corsair 880

    Boat Review: Corsair 880. Author: Adam Cort. Publish date: Nov 8, 2021. ... However, it recently occurred to me there is an exception to this rule, and that is aboard a performance trimaran like the Corsair 880. The reason for this is the basic nature of tris. Aboard a monohull (especially one with a keel), things may get a little hectic in the ...

  3. Boat Review: Corsair 760R

    The Corsair 760R's hulls and deck are all vacuum-bagged with a PVC foam core, and the crossbeams are resin-infused with carbon-fiber reinforcements in high-stress areas, like the rudders and rudder cases. A retractable daggerboard makes it possible to sail as close to the wind as any monohull, and the rudder blade is retractable.

  4. Corsair 880: Best Sport Boat

    Best SportBoat 2021Corsair 880 Billy Black. On a cold November afternoon, we rolled up to the dock at the ancient Cape Cod Shipyard, hard along the waters of the Wareham River Basin, for the concluding sail of our 2021 Boat of the Year campaign aboard the Corsair 880, a 28-foot folding trimaran built in, of all places, Vietnam. It wasn't on purpose, but you could easily say we saved the best ...

  5. Corsair 880 Trimaran 2021 Review by SAIL Magazine

    However, it recently occurred to me there is an exception to this rule, and that is aboard a performance trimaran like the Corsair 880. - Adam Cort from SAIL Magazine. ... By lucychu | 2021-12-29T15:45:58+07:00 November 16th, 2021 | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Corsair 880 Trimaran 2021 Review by SAIL Magazine. Share This Story, Choose ...

  6. Corsair 880 Trimaran

    Corsair 880 - A brilliant toy for gliding across the water. Corsair 880, a modern and ambitious trimaran that has a reputation to uphold: it is the new variation of the mythical Corsair F27, one of the most popular cruising trimarans in the world. Highly anticipated in 2020, the 880's original launch schedule was hampered by Covid.

  7. REVIEW: Sailing The Corsair 880 Sport Trimaran

    We go sailing on the super efficient 28ft Corsair 880 trimaran, that sails fast then folds up and tows away. This is can convert up to 100% of wind into boa...

  8. Corsair Sprint 750: Trailerable Sailing Fun

    A fast trimaran brings out the daysailor in all of us. A successful evolution of the Corsair 24, the new Corsair Sprint 750 Mark II is a fast, versatile, trailerable trimaran built for a perfect day of sailing. The Sprint shares the same hull design as its cousin, the Dash 750, with the same large buoyant floats, beams, and folding system.

  9. Boat Review by Multihulls World of: Trimaran Corsair F 31

    CORSAIR MARINE INTL. Boat Test price $3.00Inc. tax. Purchase. With 300 units built over more than 20 years, the F-31 is undoubtedly one of the most remarkable 30-foot (9 m) trimarans on the market. For a long time seen as overpriced, this foldable and transportable little rocket is now much more accessible. This is a trimaran that hasn't aged ...

  10. Sailing the Corsair 760 Trimaran [BOAT DEMO & REVIEW]

    We go on a SOLO adventure onboard the thrilling Corsair 760 trimaran to remote national parks to see all design features of this ultra versatile boat and dis...

  11. Corsair 880 Trimaran Technical Tour Corsair Marine trimaran

    Corsair 880 Trimaran COMPLETE TECHNICAL TOUR. The Corsair 880 is on-tour with the amazing couple, Billy and Sierra, of the sailing channel Tulas Endless Summer. In fact, Billy and Sierra are into everything water and anything to do with the ocean - including surfing, paddling, swimming, kiting, spearfishing and especially SAILING!

  12. Corsair 36, Fast Cruising Tri

    Draft (daggerboard down) 6'0″. Mast length 47'6″. Sail area 817 sq. ft. (1,084 w/screacher) Base price $208,000. www.corsairmarine.com. More: Bench seats aside, this trimaran is flexible ...

  13. The Corsair F-24 Used Boat Review

    The Corsair F-24 Used Boat Review. Posted March 28, 2017. ... this month I am going to take a look at Corsair Marine's F-24 trimaran. Corsair Marine was started in Chula Vista, CA, in 1986, to build and market the 27--a trimaran design of New Zealand native Ian Farrier. Farrier, who had previously established a reputation for successful multi ...

  14. Corsair Cruze 970 Sailboat Review

    The sporty, foldable, trailerable Corsair Cruze 970 trimaran will routinely knock off double-digit boat speeds. Since 1985 the Corsair 31 has been a familiar trimaran on the racing and cruising scene. At yards in Australia and California, 303 of that model were built, with subtle design tweaks over the years.

  15. Quick Look: Corsair Dash 750

    Alvah Simon reviews this multihulled adventurer for the Cruising World 2010 Sailboat Show in our January 2010 issue. With enhanced performance and improved livability, the 24-foot-long Dash 750 trimaran replaces the popular Corsair F-24 Mark II. It weighs less than 2,000 pounds and folds up to a street-legal width of 8 feet 2 inches, so this ...

  16. Corsair Pulse 600: Fast Company

    Corsair Marine, which revolutionized the production market for cruising trimarans, was founded in 1984 in Chula Vista, Calif., by the late John Walton, a son of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton. The first model to roll off the assembly line near the Mexican border, the F27 designed by Kiwi Ian Farrier, became an instant success.

  17. Corsair Marine Trimarans

    Some Corsair trimaran models go from trailer to water in 25 minutes, and with practice even the largest boat models can be done in 40 minutes. Corsair 880 Trimaran | 2022 Boat Review by Multihulls World. Read Article. Corsair 880 - Drive Out, Fold Out, Thrill Out, Chill Out.

  18. Trimaran Reviews Corsair 37CR

    Corsair 37 Specifications. The Corsair 37 CR is rapidly growing in popularity based on trimaran Reviews. Part of the reason why buyers are so quick to recommend the 37CR is due to the specs that are hard to find in similar style boats. The LOA is thirty-seven feet. Its LWL is thirty-five feet.

  19. Boat Review by Multihulls World of: Trimaran Corsair 28

    Discover the boat review of Trimaran Corsair 28, its technical specifications, and all the classified ads for a pre-owned Corsair 28 with Multihulls World. ... France), where we met Guy Albaret, director of La Landriais Marines Services shipyard, which imports the Corsair trimaran line into France. The F-24, F-31, and now the F-28, designed by ...

  20. Trimaran Interiors Corsair Trimaran sailing www.blog.corsairmarine.com

    This blog is dedicated to showing you the impressive interior design of the Corsair 880, the legitimate heir to the trimaran revolution. Our newest model, the Corsair 880 - A 28'8" Trimaran, was introduced to the sailing community few months ago mostly via video, webinar and other virtual means. Having seen the impressive lines and ...

  21. Corsair boats for sale

    Corsair boats for sale on YachtWorld are available for a swath of prices from $34,500 on the moderate end of the spectrum, with costs up to $290,864 for the most expensive, custom yachts. What Corsair model is the best? Some of the most popular Corsair models now listed include: 880, 760, 880 Sport, Dash 750 and 28R #45.

  22. 2023 Lincoln Corsair First Test: Not Quite the Whole Package

    During our testing on the dragstrip, the refreshed Lincoln Corsair reached 60 mph in 6.6 seconds, just a tenth of a second behind the old 2.3-liter turbo-four luxury SUV and 0.7 second quicker ...

  23. Corsair Scimitar Elite Wireless Mouse Review: Custom Gaming Perfection

    The Corsair Scimitar Elite Wireless caught my wandering eye. Much like on my trusty G600, the 12 thumb buttons on the Scimitar Elite Wireless have a ton of customization options.