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Catalina 18

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Post by john_k » Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:33 pm

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Re: Catalina 18

Post by Michel » Mon Jul 31, 2017 5:01 pm

Post by john_k » Mon Jul 31, 2017 5:26 pm

Post by CaptDon » Sun Sep 03, 2017 6:30 pm

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  • Sailboat Guide

Catalina Capri 18

Catalina Capri 18 is a 18 ′ 0 ″ / 5.5 m monohull sailboat designed by Gerry Douglas and built by Catalina Yachts starting in 1985.

Drawing of Catalina Capri 18

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

In 2000 Catalina Yachts renamed the CAPRI 18 to the CATALINA 18. Photo courtesy Adam Hunt.

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Hunter 212 vs Catalina Capri 18

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Hi all...first post.. I'm a newbie looking to buy my first sailboat. I've narrowed it down to two different choices. I'm looking at a used Hunter 212 and a used Capri 18. They both seem like they would suit my needs. I'm just searching for good things and bad things about both. Anyone here have experience with these boats and could you tell me what I should be looking for in purchasing a used one? e.g. common parts to wear out quick? Also, whats the difference between the MK2 Capri and the non.. What year did they become Mk2.. Thanks for any help.. Mike  

I can't speak to those specific boats, but I've had a Catalina Capri 14.2 foot model for over 15 years and it has been a great little boat. Its draft is a mere 3 inches with the board up and it is only ~350lbs so very easy to work with it. Even has a roller furler for the jib. I've done nothing to it, maintenance wise, in all that time other than clean it once each spring and replace the hiking stick once (I ripped it off when the hiking strap gave way and me and my crew ended up in the drink). It is probably worth about the $1200 I paid for it 15+ years ago. Good luck  

A 14.2 sounds good...just can't seem to find one anywhere near me. I live near Nashville. I wish I could say I was near Seattle. That city is definitely one of the places I would like to visit. I've got my eye on a 1989 Capri 18 at Snug Harbor Boats that seems to be reasonably priced although it doesn't include an engine. Thanks Mike  

I owned a Capri 18, but either boat would be fine, depending on which one appeals to you the most.  

I've found a used Capri 18 that seems to be ok judging from the pictures at Snug Harbor Boats in Georgia. I've been reading reviews on the 212 and it seems to have some problems so I think I will go with the 18. Has anyone ever dealt with Snug Harbor Boats previously? Thanks Mike  

Hunter 212 Catalina Hi, I currently own a Catalina 22 and a Hunter 212. The Catalina is a 1970 boat and the 212 is a 2001. The Catalina 22 is a solid boat and so is the Hunter 212. I read all the reviews I could find on the Hunter and it seamed they had a problem with the tiller. I have not found it to be a problem. I have sailed the Hunter in 15mph wind with gust up to 25 and it was solid as a rock. The cabin space inside the boat is different. The Catalina offers a nice table and sitting area with a bench next to it. The forward V birth has very little clearance and I would want to sleep on the 1/2 births or the table area instead. The Hunter has more room inside the boat and more room in the cockpit. The V birth is comfortable and spacious for a 21' boat. The biggest selling point for me was the open transom on the Hunter. It provides me with a swimming platform and easy access when beached. I have used a 3.5 hp motor and a Mini Kota 55 electric motor for auxilary power. The 3.5 was more power than I needed for either boat, but it has the advantages of reserve power. My Hunter was used by a sailing school before I bought it and they probably had a bunch of newbies on the boats. The tiller held up to all that. The maintenance on the Hunter is much less. I still have both boats but will probably keep the Hunter longer.  

Re: Hunter 212 can a 6 feet tall person fit in the v-berth? This boat is on my short list, started a thread here, you can check it out if you like: edit: can't post links as my post count is less than 10, but my thread is in the boat buying section, easy to find how do you find its sailing in light and heavy winds? I contacted Hunter Cs and they mentionned swing keel is only 130lbs out of the total 1800lbs, which started getting me worried about the boat`s stability, especially singlehanded. i see you've changed the keel back to a swing, any idea how much it weighs? how about the boat total weight? just curious if you've weighted them...Guess I want to make sure this boat has the ability to plane early, and that you`re not always finding yourself cutting down on your sail area to stay stable.  

Hunter 212 Hi, I think you would find the V-berth to be long enough for you. I'm 5'10" and it is good for me. I have only tried it out and not slept over night in it. The V berth gives much more space than my Catalina 22. The keel weight is probably less than 200. I have carried it and moved it around before we got it on the boat. I have never reefed the sails on the boat. I have found it to be a very stable boat and I enjoy the heck out of it. I just added a MinKota 45 electric motor for a kicker and took off the 3.5 hp motor and put that on the Catalina. I think it is best if you can try these boats out before buying them to make sure they are right for you. Of course I bought both my boats without sailing on them first. Rick Rmoynahan yahoo  

Original post was September 2007. This is probably a cold trail.  

I heard from Zemaniak and he is taking delivery of a Hunter 212 on Monday. He found a video I posted on Youtube Kaweah Sailing, and left the message there. Rick  

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catalina capri 18 sailboat review

Capri 18 catalina

The capri 18 catalina is a 18.0ft fractional sloop designed by frank butler/gerry douglas and built in fiberglass by catalina yachts since 1985..

The Capri 18 catalina is a light sailboat which is a good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a day-boat.

Capri 18 catalina sailboat under sail

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Catalina Capri 22

catalina capri 18 sailboat review

Addressing comfort first, the Capri has the advantage over the other three boats this month in that it has a head. Yes-sir-ee that old Wayside Chapel can come in handy sometimes, especially if you don't have the Kevlar bladder of a 19-year-old. This head is not enclosed, but tucked between the V-berths. You can pull a curtain for privacy if you need it.

The Capri also offers the advantage of having berths. This is not exactly what I would call a cruising layout, but with some careful packing and stowage, a family of four could cruise this boat. Even better, a couple of teenagers could throw their gear on the V-berths and sleep aft and cruise in enough comfort to keep them happy.

This is a true keel boat with a D/L of 123. You can have your choice of standard fin keel with 700 pounds of lead, or the wing keel with 650 pounds of lead. Draft with the fin keel is 4 feet and with the wing 2 feet, 8 inches. I can't imagine sailing a boat with 2 feet, 8 inches of draft, and I hope I never get the chance to try it. Beam is 8 feet, 2 inches for ease of trailering.

The changes over the previous model include a more pronounced knuckle at the forefoot, a finer bow, more beam aft, a new rudder planform and much less rocker. In short, the new 22's hull looks much more modern in its overall shape. I wonder which would be the faster boat if the boats were equipped identically. I know on paper the new version should outsail the older version. But strange things can happen in the wonderful world of yacht design. The numbers are virtually identical. The new keel is smaller in wetted surface, and the rudder is deeper. I'm sure the additional 2 inches of beam on the new model is only at the deck.

The cabintrunk has been redesigned too. The new cabintrunk is sleeker and less angular than the original. I like the long cockpit of this design. This cockpit is as big or at least as long as many you will find on boats over 28 feet. I could comfortably lay down on these cockpit seats.

The rig is the same as the old 22. Okay, they did change to an angled halyard exit block for a better fairlead on the new 22. Comparing the two drawings, old and new, I do see some changes, but they are not reflected in the spec sheet. The SA/D is 21.66. The new rig has a taller "I" dimension and either a shorter "E" dimension or a different traveler placement. The boom also looks lower on the new 22.

I have always been a fan of the Catalina line. Maybe it's because I'm a West Coast guy, but there is something I relate to in the general design focus of the Catalinas. I once owned a Catalina 27 and was quite happy with it. I taught my wife to sail in that boat. I applaud Catalina for not following the herd down the Euro styling path or is it the path of "Eurine." The clean almost classic good looks of this 22-footer will keep it looking fresh and handsome for years to come.

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catalina capri 18 sailboat review

Which Sailboat?

Catalina (Capri) 14.2 Review

Catalina 14.2 Specifications, Deck Layout, and Sail Plan

The Catalina Capri 14.2, known later as simply the Catalina 14.2, is an excellent sport sailboat and day sailer oriented toward family and youth use.  The boat was designed by Ted Carpentier and Frank Butler of Catalina Yachts .  Catalina derived the boat from the Omega 14 produced by Frank Butler’s Coronado Yachts prior to the formation of Catalina Yachts.  After the formation of Catalina Yachts, the Omega 14 design was modified by adding a foredeck and a cuddy beneath the foredeck to create the Capri 14.2.  Since 1983, over 5,200 Catalina 14.2s have been built.   Production continues .

While Catalina 14.2s are frequently used for family cruising, the boat can provide an exhilarating sailing experience due to its semi-planing hull and clearly sporting sail-area-to-displacement ratio of 36.  As a family sport boat and day sailer, the Catalina 14.2 is primarily composed of a large cockpit that easily holds 4 adults.  One owner reports sailing inland lakes and bays of the Outer Banks in the eastern U.S. with his wife and 3 children aboard, and with the cuddy and areas beneath the cockpit seats laden with camping supplies.  Forward of the dominant cockpit, a large cuddy cabin provides storage for day sail, picnic and camping supplies, batteries, and emergency equipment.  As expected for a sport boat or day sailer of this size, the cuddy provides no berths, head, or galley.  (If berths, galley, or head are important to you, consider the Catalina 22 , which is also easily trailered.)

Catalina 14.2 Class Racing, Courtesy Arizona Yacht Club

The Catalina 14.2 benefits from its large production volume, long production run, that its manufacturer is still in business, and a plethora of parts continue to be available from the manufacturer and  Catalina Direct .  Active Catalina 14.2 class racing fleets and events exist but are limited compared to some other small sailboats such as Flying Scots, Moths, and Lasers.  Presumably, this is because of the boat’s intended purpose and reputation as a family sport boat and day sailer, rather than a class racing boat.

INDENTIFYING VARIOUS CATALINA 14.2 MODELS

Three models of the Catalina 14.2 have been produced since 1983.  The different models are popularly deemed “Mod 1”, “Mod 2”, and “Mod 3”.  The Mod 1 models have a single open space below decks and came from the factory with a marine plywood hatch to enclose the cuddy and the rest of the space.  The Mod 2 models, introduced around 1990, had a fiberglass box glued inside the entrance of the cuddy, which while preventing water intrusion into the cuddy and the rest of the hull in the event of a capsize, also made the potential storage space in the cuddy inaccessible and made maintenance of the inside of the hull more difficult.  Mod 2 models had a canvas covering over the hatch to hide the box.  Six years later in 1996, Catalina introduced the Mod 3, which removed the fiberglass box and included a water-tight bulkhead at the aft end of the cuddy, making for three nearly water tight areas in the hull, including the cuddy with the hatch installed and a space under each cockpit seat.  Mod 3 boats were delivered with a more durable and watertight plastic hatch for the cuddy.  Also on the Mod 3 boats, the wooden splash guards at the aft end of the deck where removed and instead the deck was simply rounded up from the forward end of the cockpit coamings.

Catalina 14.2 Specifications, Deck Layout, and Sail Plan

The Catalina 14.2 hull is solid hand-laid fiberglass.  The deck is also solid fiberglass laminate with a molded-in non-skid pattern.  The deck is attached to the hull in Catalina’s standard shoebox design.  Unlike larger Catalina boats intended for more rigorous sea conditions, on Mod 1 and Mod 2 models the deck is fastened to the hull only with chemical bonding – there are no mechanical fasteners.  On Mod 3 boats, Catalina also through-bolted the hull-to-deck joint.  Older Catalina 14.2s may suffer damage of the hull-to-deck joint so that the water-tightness of the joint is compromised.  After suffering such damage, many owners strengthen the joint with mechanical fasteners with relative ease, as the joint is easily accessible at the gunwale.

Due to the design of the Catalina 14.2’s gunwale and exposed hull-to-deck joint, installation of a rub rail can serve to protect the hull-to-deck joint from damage.   Installation is straightforward.  Several rub rails from Taco Metals in Miami, Florida work well, particularly this white flexible vinyl model with white flexible vinyl insert .

The hull is stiffened with several plywood stringers beneath the cockpit, which also support the cockpit sole, reducing flex under foot.  The seats normally flex under foot, which while initially unsettling, provides for a more comfortable ride.  Due to the more rounded and thus stronger foredeck and the additional bulkhead at the aft end of the cuddy, Mod 3 boats are stiffer than Mod 1 and Mod 2 boats.

While wood stringers could be cause for alarm, few Catalina 14.2s see enough water left in the hull to cause rot.  If rot is discovered, replacing the stringers can be difficult due to tight working conditions inside the hull.  A few owners with rotted stringers reported solving the problem by knocking out the old wood and pouring water-resistant closed-cell expandable foam under the cockpit sole and seats.  Depending on the density of the foam selected, positive buoyancy is an additional benefit of such a repair.  Water-resistant closed-cell foam is crucial for this application.  The  TotalBoat Liquid Urethane Foam Kit, 6 Lb Density, Closed Cell for Flotation & Reinforcement works well for this application, providing both structural strength and positive buoyancy.

Catalina 14.2 Capsized, Hobie Baby Bob Prevents Turtling

As delivered from the factory, the Catalina 14.2 lacks positive buoyancy materials in the hull.  If the hull is allowed to fill with water, the boat will sink.  On Mod 1 and Mod 3 boats, securing the cuddy hatch board fast whenever underway is paramount.

Catalina fitted foam plugs in the end of the mast on later boats, intended to provide some buoyancy in the mast to prevent turtling if capsized.  However, the relatively broad beam of the boat limits the effectiveness of this design because most of the mast remains out of the water unless turtled.  Many owners fit Hobie Baby Bob flotation bulbs (available on Amazon) to the top of their masts so that if the boat is knocked down, the boat does not turtle.

KEEL CONFIGURATIONS AND RUDDER

The vast majority of Catalina 14.2s were delivered with a pivoting centerboard that kicks up if grounded.  The centerboard is held in place when down by a shock cord that is connected from the aft end of the top of the centerboard to the transom at the end of the cockpit.  The rudder also kicks up.  Earlier boats have a solid wood centerboard while later boats have a foam-cored fiberglass centerboard.   Rudders are wood or foam-cored encapsulated in fiberglass.   Solid HDPE rudders are available from Catalina Direct.   A medium-aspect fixed keel was also offered that added 200 lbs of ballast to the boat, which makes her slower but more stable, closer to an older-style traditional day sailer.  Catalina named the boats with the fixed keel the Catalina 14.2 K.

As a semi-planing boat displacing little water, the centerboard model requires no centerboard trunk.  The centerboard simply slides through a slot with only a few inches separating the floor of the cockpit from the water below.  With enough speed, water can spray up through this slot into the cockpit.  Catalina Direct offers a  canvas gasket  to surround the centerboard in the slot, which prevents this spray.

The Catalina 14.2 is rigged a as a fractional sloop with a self-tacking jib.  The mast is anodized aluminum and supported by a stainless steel headstay and single set of swept-back anodized aluminum spreaders with stainless steel shrouds.  The shrouds include adjustable brackets rather than turnbuckles that make rig adjustments quick if not entirely precise.  However, the headstay includes a turnbuckle which can be used to achieve precise rig tuning.  There is no backstay, which makes un-stepping the mast easier and frees up the cockpit under sail.  The rig is very light-weight so that one person can ease the mast down when un-stepping and push it up when stepping, although another person is handy to guide the mast with the forestay.  All other rigging hardware is stainless steel.  In 2012, Catalina changed to a Selden made rig.  From the factory, the boom has no uphaul so that when the mainsail is dropped, the boom falls into the cockpit.  Some owners install an uphaul, rigid boom vang, or boom kicker to prevent this.

As appropriate with a family sport boat or day sailer, all control lines are easily accessible from the cockpit.  The mainsheet is managed from a stout spring-mounted pivoting block and jam cleat in the center of the cockpit.  Jib sheets are managed from jam cleats on the side decks.  The side decks also include a jib car track and cars that allow precise adjustment of jib sheeting angle.  With sails of this size, no winches are necessary.

Catalina 14.2 Cockpit and Deck

The cockpit of the Catalina 14.2 offers good sole depth, seat width, and coaming height for relative comfort in a sport oriented boat.  The coaming height and side deck height may be considered low for some less interested in an exciting sail, or more accustomed to day sails in a Flying Scot or a more traditional day sailer design.  The cockpit seats are long enough to sleep upon.  The relatively small surface area of the cockpit sole, cockpit seats, side decks, and forward deck are small enough to prevent much flex.

Forward of the cockpit above the cuddy is a solid deck which is handy when dealing with the jib although feels less than secure in rough water.  The side decks are reasonably wide as well.

The only brightwork on the Catalina 14.2 comprised splash guards installed at the front of the cockpit and above the hatch to the cuddy, only on Mod 1 and Mod 2 boats.  These boards are easily removed for complete refinishing if necessary.  Mod 3 boats had this brightwork eliminated.

Catalina 14.2 Exciting Sail, Courtesy Vincent Malo

The Catalina 14.2 can be a very exciting boat to sail.  Hiking straps were installed throughout the cockpit from the factory.  With its semi-planing hull, the boat achieves speeds great in excess of a displacement hull sailing boat.  Its relatively deep centerboard and rudder provide excellent grip for pointing to windward.  Riding close to the water, the boat’s occupants easily sense the speed at which they glide over the water.  Due to its semi-planing hull and small size (and like most small sailboats), the Catalina 14.2’s pointing ability suffers immensely with blown out or otherwise worn out sails.

AUXILIARY POWER

Catalina 14.2 Outboard Bracket

The Catalina 14.2 did not come from the factory with any auxiliary propulsion, but an outboard motor mount was an option.  Many owners use rowing paddles for auxiliary propulsion, but due to the beam of the boat and the orientation of the side decks, paddles are difficult to use.  Many owners install small outboards, 1-3 h.p. are more than adequate for propelling the boat.

Electric trolling motors are a popular choice for auxiliary propulsion with a battery installed at the aft end of the cockpit against the transom or in the cuddy.  Either way, the battery should be installed in a watertight battery box secured in place with mounting hardware.  Due to the easily-driven semi-planing hull, electric trolling motors are an effective means for auxiliary propulsion, with only the smallest 30 thrust-lbs models necessary for adequate propulsion.  For owners interested in sailing into a headwind off a beach or against a tide, auxiliary propulsion is paramount.

Catalina 14.2 On Trailer

The Catalina 14.2 is easy to trailer with nearly any vehicle due to its light weight of 340 lbs.  Due to its light weight, trailers require only a single axle.  The relatively flat bottom and retractable centerboard make trailers intended for power boats work as an effective trailer.  Trailering is easy due to the boat’s simple rig – only the forestay must be disconnected to unstep the mast.

In addition to an excellent family sport boat and day sailer, the Catalina 14.2 also makes an interesting tender for the right liveaboard or cruiser.  With its weight of 340 lbs, the boat can be rigged for davits or simply towed if the sailor is not against towing a dinghy.  Despite being a semi-planing boat and having an open slot for the centerboard in the cockpit sole, the Catalina 14.2 with its wide flat bottom has more initial stability than most tenders and can be well laden with crew and supplies without shipping water through the slot.  However as the boat is laden, its ability to point to windward suffers greatly.  The same owner who reports sailing with his family, children, and camping supplies, also reports being unable to point better than a beam reach without auxiliary power as the boat was so overladen.  With a larger electric trolling motor, large battery installed, and combined with a solar panel for charging the battery, the Catalina 14.2 can power through adverse currents with excellent if not unlimited range.

Catalina 14.2 With Full Crew

Due to the excellent build quality and simplicity of the Catalina 14.2, the ready availability of spare parts, and that the manufacturer is still in business producing new Catalina 14.2s, resale values of the Catalina 14.2 remain high.  New boats sell for over $6,000.  Nevertheless, neglected Catalina 14.2s can be had on the used boat market at a steep discount, making the boat a potentially excellent value on the used market.  Prices vary widely between $1,500 and $4,500,  depending on the year of the boat, installed accessories like motors, condition of the sails, hull condition, the condition of the trailer if included with the boat.  Neglected boats can be made ship shape for a modicum of investment compared with larger boats and typical tenders.  At the time of writing, only two Catalina 14.2s are available on Yachtworld.com , but many making good options are available on Craigslist.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Used Catalina Capri 14.2s for Sale on Craigslist Nationwide

Catalina 14.2 Brochure

CATALINA 14.2 UNDER SAIL, TACKING

CATALINA 14.2 RIGGING GUIDE

CATALINA 14.2 CLASS RACING

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2 thoughts on “ catalina (capri) 14.2 review ”.

  • Pingback: 1988 Catalina Capri 14.2 sailboat for sale in Virginia | Boats & Yachts For Sale | Used Boats and New Boats For Sale

Great article – thanks! I believe I have heard that the Capri 14.2 Mod 1 had a hollow transom and that the transom was reinforced (made solid) on a later mod (2 or 3). Which mod was this, and do you know the specs of how much thrust or weight each mod can handle?

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Capri 22 Sailboat Review

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The Capri 22 Sailboat Review is finally in and the answer is a good one. A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to go sailing for a couple of days on my friend’s Capri 22. I loved every minute of it. Besides the fact that we happened to go out on one of the most perfect sailing days (wind and weather-wise), the day was pretty close to perfect.

Here’s what I liked about it:

  • Cushioned Seats
  • Fits 6-8 People
  • Fast on the Water
  • Heels Like a Champ
  • Stantions and Railings are at A Good Height and Feel Sturdy
  • Easily Maneuverable

Things I didn’t like As Much

  • Cabin is Smaller
  • The placement of Certain Lines Can be Difficult To Set Up At Times

It’s a good compromise between a “Cruiser” and all out racer. I’d place it closer to the day-sailor side. The Capri 22 is great trailering. It’s light enough so that towing this boat doesn’t feel like a burden. The deck is very spacious and can fit 6-8 people. One thing to note: If you’re looking for a boat that is more for pleasure cruises and will have more above and below deck amenities, this wouldn’t be my first choice . You’d probably want to look at a Catalina 22 or something similar. The Capri 22 is closer to a racing boat. It is still spacious enough for 8 people, you’ll find a smaller cabin and a few less amenities on board.

The boat I was on, was a 2002 model, so still fairly new, in nautical boating terms. Overall, I had a great day with a good friend, lots of sun, wind and good times on the Capri 22. Maybe I’ll just buy one for myself! ~Terry

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Terry Judd has been an avid sailor for the past 40 years. Growing up in San Diego, he grew up on the water, yet still learns something new every time he ventures out. As Co-Owner of Get Wet Sailing, he's dedicated to bringing you useful information that sailors and adventures alike would want.

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catalina capri 18 sailboat review

Catalina 16.5 Review

  • Thread starter Ray Seligman
  • Start date Jan 11, 2003
  • Catalina Owner Forums
  • Smaller Boats

Ray Seligman

About 20 years ago I owned an O'Day Day Sailer and had a great time with it, daysailing and occasionally racing. I want to get back into sailing and I am excited about the Catalina 16.5. Should I be excited? I can't seem to get any feedback on the boat. Looks like it has a fairly large sail/weight ration which I assume means that it moves out well. Nice size cockpit.Any thoughts? Is there another similar boat that you would recommend instead? Please reply to [email protected]. Much thanks. Author: Edit or delete this reply  

Sail Magazine December Issue Check out the article in the December 2002 Issue of Sail. They test seven daysailers including the the 16.5 Catalina.  

Endre Gastony

Response It is a great boat, based on my experience. Please see my response to a similar request by Nancy and Bill Berg, at the top of the list.  

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CAPRI 16 (CATALINA) Detailed Review

https://images.harbormoor.com/originals/52fa2020-4d43-4f78-8f94-1bfdc11b6f88

If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of CAPRI 16 (CATALINA). Built by Catalina Yachts and designed by Frank W. Butler, the boat was first built in 1987. It has a hull type of Fin w/transom hung rudder and LOA is 5.03. Its sail area/displacement ratio 18.11. Its auxiliary power tank, manufactured by undefined, runs on Outboard.

CAPRI 16 (CATALINA) has retained its value as a result of superior building, a solid reputation, and a devoted owner base. Read on to find out more about CAPRI 16 (CATALINA) and decide if it is a fit for your boating needs.

Boat Information

Boat specifications, sail boat calculation, rig and sail specs, auxillary power tank, contributions, who designed the capri 16 (catalina).

CAPRI 16 (CATALINA) was designed by Frank W. Butler.

Who builds CAPRI 16 (CATALINA)?

CAPRI 16 (CATALINA) is built by Catalina Yachts.

When was CAPRI 16 (CATALINA) first built?

CAPRI 16 (CATALINA) was first built in 1987.

How long is CAPRI 16 (CATALINA)?

CAPRI 16 (CATALINA) is 4.78 m in length.

What is mast height on CAPRI 16 (CATALINA)?

CAPRI 16 (CATALINA) has a mast height of 5.97 m.

Member Boats at HarborMoor

IMAGES

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  3. CAPRI 18 (CATALINA): Reviews, Specifications, Built, Engine

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  4. Catalina Capri 18

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COMMENTS

  1. Catalina Capri 18

    In the mid-1980s, Catalina sought to produce a pocket cruiser that would provide the features of a larger yacht in a compact, trailerable and affordable boat. It introduced the Capri 18 in early 1986, and to underscore the effectiveness of the little boat's seaworthy hull and solid performance in both light and heavy wind, singlehanded sailor ...

  2. CAPRI 18 (CATALINA)

    In 2000 Catalina Yachts renamed the CAPRI 18 to the CATALINA 18. Photo courtesy Adam Hunt. Sailboat Forum. View All Topics: ... Latest Topics: Be the first one to create a topic + Calculations Help. SA/Disp.: A sail area/displacement ratio below 16 would be considered under powered; 16 to 20 would indicate reasonably good performance; above 20 ...

  3. Catalina 18 Owners Opinions

    22. Catalina 18 273 Pine Beach NJ. Aug 20, 2018. #2. Hi! I have owned my 1988 Catalina Capri 18 since 1998 and sail in the Toms River and Barnegat Bay. I usually sail by myself or with my daughter. I can say that the boat will satisfy most of your wish list.

  4. Catalina 18

    Reviews on sailing (from SCA and elsewhere) have all been positive. Catalina 18 made the list of "12 boats we loved in our first ten years." Top. CaptDon New Contributor Posts: 8 ... Our first sail to Catalina Island was on our Capri/Catalina-18. We LOVED the boat, and ours came with the optional factory mast raising system. ...

  5. CAPRI 18 (CATALINA) Detailed Review

    If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of CAPRI 18 (CATALINA). Built by Catalina Yachts and designed by Gerry Douglas, the boat was first built in 1985. It has a hull type of Wing Keel and LOA is 5.49. Its sail area/displacement ratio 18.97.

  6. Catalina 18

    The Catalina 18, formerly known as the Capri 18, is a trailerable American sailboat that was designed by Frank Butler and Gerry Douglas and first built in 1985. [1] [2] [3] The design was originally marketed as the Capri 18, but the name was changed by the manufacturer to Catalina 18 in 2000.

  7. Catalina Capri 18

    Catalina Capri 18 is a 18′ 0″ / 5.5 m monohull sailboat designed by Gerry Douglas and built by Catalina Yachts starting in 1985. ... The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more. Formula. D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³ D: Displacement of the boat in pounds. LWL ...

  8. Review of Capri 18 (Catalina)

    The immersion rate is defined as the weight required to sink the boat a certain level. The immersion rate for Capri 18 (Catalina) is about 77 kg/cm, alternatively 431 lbs/inch. Meaning: if you load 77 kg cargo on the boat then it will sink 1 cm. Alternatively, if you load 431 lbs cargo on the boat it will sink 1 inch.

  9. Catalina Capri vs Rhodes 19

    Boat Review Forum. SailNet is a forum community dedicated to Sailing enthusiasts. Come join the discussion about sailing, modifications, classifieds, troubleshooting, repairs, reviews, maintenance, ... I've whittled down our daysailer search to a Catalina Capri (18 or 22) that would come in between 5-8K depending on the boat or a Rhodes 19 that ...

  10. First sail boat, 18' Catalina Capri? : r/sailing

    First sail boat, 18' Catalina Capri? I'm going to go look at a Catalina Capri 18' model. It's currently in the water. Clean and dry inside with 3 jibs and a main sail all in serviceable condition. 6 hp Johnson. 3700 dollars. As long as there are no soft spots in the deck and it's actually dry should I have any concerns about this boat?

  11. Hunter 212 vs Catalina Capri 18

    87689 posts · Joined 1999. #7 · Mar 20, 2008. Hunter 212 Catalina. Hi, I currently own a Catalina 22 and a Hunter 212. The Catalina is a 1970 boat and the 212 is a 2001. The Catalina 22 is a solid boat and so is the Hunter 212. I read all the reviews I could find on the Hunter and it seamed they had a problem with the tiller.

  12. Capri 18 catalina

    The Capri 18 catalina is a 18.0ft fractional sloop designed by Frank Butler/Gerry Douglas and built in fiberglass by Catalina Yachts since 1985. The Capri 18 catalina is a light sailboat which is a good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized.

  13. Issue #30 Nov/Dec 2004 Features Catalina (Capri) 18 Review

    SCAMP Sailboat; RowCruiser; Other Designs; Books. Adventure and Sailing Stories; Boat Repair and Do-it-Yourself; Boat Design and Selection; ... Issue #30 Nov/Dec 2004 Features Catalina (Capri) 18 Review; Issue #30 Nov/Dec 2004 Features Catalina (Capri) 18 Review $ 7.95. SKU: SKU#30: Weight: 0.50 lbs

  14. Catalina Capri 22

    Designed by the in-house Catalina team, the new 22 replaces the old Capri 22. The changes are significant. This is not one of those cosmetic redesign jobs. This boat is new from the hull on up. Addressing comfort first, the Capri has the advantage over the other three boats this month in that it has a head. Yes-sir-ee that old Wayside Chapel ...

  15. Sailing a Catalina Capri 18" on Lake Travis

    My 1st time sailing a sailboat, I decided it might be best to leave the little ones at home and go solo.

  16. Catalina (Capri) 14.2 Review

    Catalina (Capri) 14.2 Review. The Catalina Capri 14.2, known later as simply the Catalina 14.2, is an excellent sport sailboat and day sailer oriented toward family and youth use. The boat was designed by Ted Carpentier and Frank Butler of Catalina Yachts. Catalina derived the boat from the Omega 14 produced by Frank Butler's Coronado Yachts ...

  17. Capri 22 Sailboat Review

    The Capri 22 is closer to a racing boat. It is still spacious enough for 8 people, you'll find a smaller cabin and a few less amenities on board. The boat I was on, was a 2002 model, so still fairly new, in nautical boating terms. Overall, I had a great day with a good friend, lots of sun, wind and good times on the Capri 22.

  18. CAPRI 22 (CATALINA)

    It takes into consideration "reported" sail area, displacement and length at waterline. The higher the number the faster speed prediction for the boat. A cat with a number 0.6 is likely to sail 6kts in 10kts wind, a cat with a number of 0.7 is likely to sail at 7kts in 10kts wind. KSP = (Lwl*SA÷D)^0.5*0.5

  19. Chesapeake Drift: Sailing to Rock Hall, Maryland on a Catalina Capri 18

    Sailing a small boat from the western shore to the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay with a short walk at Rock Hall Harbor. Beautiful sunset sail at the e...

  20. Catalina 16.5 Review

    Endre Gastony. Jan 18, 2003. #3. Response. It is a great boat, based on my experience. Please see my response to a similar request by Nancy and Bill Berg, at the top of the list. Not open for further replies. About 20 years ago I owned an O'Day Day Sailer and had a great time with it, daysailing and occasionally racing. I want to get back into ...

  21. CAPRI 16 (CATALINA) Detailed Review

    Built by Catalina Yachts and designed by Frank W. Butler, the boat was first built in 1987. It has a hull type of Fin w/transom hung rudder and LOA is 5.03. Its sail area/displacement ratio 18.11. Its auxiliary power tank, manufactured by undefined, runs on Outboard. CAPRI 16 (CATALINA) has retained its value as a result of superior building, a ...